secular

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secular

1. not religious.
2. over long periods of time; gradual.

secular changes, trends
changes that occur over long periods, as long as decades.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reconciliatory reactions of the Muslim democratic Ennahda Party to the rise of the nationalist-secularist Nidaa Tounes Party in the 2014 elections were important in terms of the change of the patterns of secularization in the Islamic world in general, and the relationship between democracy and secularization in Tunisia in particular.
I then examine the background of the 1960s treatments of secularization among progressive Catholic writers, showing how they tended to view secular fields like the economy as neutral, autonomous, and disenchanted.
Despite this tedium, his review on the growing literature related to the sociology of religion and secularization is impressive.
Most well-known secularization theories were derived from Durkheim and Max Weber in the 1960s, although this concept was commonly shared since enlightenment philosophy from the 18th century.
Secularization processes have, in many countries, led to a new kind of social agreement: religion must limit its influence in the public sphere and be restricted to the private domain.
But as demonstrated by the Islamic Revolution in Iran and the rise of Recep Tayyip Erdogan's party to power in Turkey, over time this forced secularization generated very broad popular opposition and brought to power, with popular support, Islamist elements that opposed secular coercion.
BEIRUT: Pope Benedict XVI appointed Boulos Matar, the Maronite bishop of Beirut, Wednesday to the Pontifical Council for the New Evangelization, a department aimed at countering growing secularization.
Hoeveler follows Taylor by defining secularization not so much as the subtraction of religion from public space or the diminution of religious beliefs and practices but as a change in the largely invisible background of ordinary understanding.
The Origins of Jewish Secularization in Eighteenth-Century Europe, by Shmuel Feiner, translated by Chaya Naor.
Discussions of secularization tend to diverge between two branches.
Over the last centuries, proponents of secularization have claimed that as societies modernize, the role of religion in public and private life diminishes.
Moreover, he was also co-editor of one of the two best collections that have explored whether secularization is the best way to describe the West's recent history (with Werner Urstorf, The Decline of Christendom in Western Europe, 1750-2000 [Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003]).