secular

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secular

1. not religious.
2. over long periods of time; gradual.

secular changes, trends
changes that occur over long periods, as long as decades.
References in periodicals archive ?
None of the aforementioned examples drift from the minimalistic definition of secularism presented previously meaning that a mutual autonomy between state and religion is still ensured.
Addressing an international conference on the 125th birth anniversary of Nehru here, Sonia said secularism was an "article of faith" for the first Prime Minister of the country.
The intention behind writing this article is to convey to the people of PakisAtan that the secularism doctrine is not anti-Islam at all.
What devout Muslims need to understand is that real secularism alone offers them something most of them seem to badly want: freedom.
The BJP's prime ministerial candidate for 2014 also told the young voters in his audience what secularism means to him.
Saddam Hussein in Iraq and the Assads in Syria, who placed secularization at the center of the Ba'ath ideology that characterized their regimes, imposed secularism more brutally.
Such hospitability could present a rather obvious problem for Americans who prefer secularism.
They prefer secularism today by any means to possible secularism under democratic credentials later on.
Judging by the huge anti Morsi protests in Egypt, it is clear most people felt his interest lay in promoting his Muslim Brotherhood and not the wishes of those who wanted their secularism protected.
Secularism is not a synonym for godlessness or atheism or any other form of anti-religiousness, said Berlinerblau, author of How to be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom.
The Joy of Secularism is the first entry in what will no doubt be a new genre of literature, one that might be called secularist religion.
This article presents a clarification of the meaning of the word secularism, proposing a more universally acceptable definition (Part I), and addresses some of the more salient legal problems that legal systems on both national and regional levels are facing within the field of religion and secular law (Part II).