secondary peritonitis


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Related to secondary peritonitis: primary peritonitis

secondary peritonitis

Surgery Peritoneal inflammation due to entry of bacteria or enzymes Etiology GI tract perforation–eg, ruptured appendix with spilling of bacteria; chemical reaction from pancreatic enzymes or bile due to perforation; overdistension of GI tract with gas and fluid; necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants. See Peritonitis.

secondary peritonitis

Peritonitis resulting from extension of infection from adjoining structures, rupture of a viscus, abscess, or trauma.
See also: peritonitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Advanced age, underlying diabetes mellitus, and postoperative TPN treatment were found to be independent risk factors for postoperative secondary peritonitis in patients who underwent oncologic upper GIT surgery (Table 4).
To the best of our knowledge all the data in the English literature concerning systemic inflammatory response during abdominal surgery for secondary peritonitis are derived from animal models.
"Mortality and morbidity of planned relaparotomy versus relaparotomy on demand for secondary peritonitis (Br J Surg 2004; 91: 1046-1054),"Br J Surg, Vol.91(12), pp.1653
Laparostomy in patients with severe secondary peritonitis. Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg 2009;15:52-57.
Common causes of secondary peritonitis include a ruptured (split) stomach ulcer, a burst appendix, pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), severe trauma to the abdomen such as a knife or gunshot wound, and digestive disorders.
Validation of MPI and PIA II in two different groups of patients with secondary peritonitis. Hepatogastroenterology 2001;48(37):147-51.
This therapy has been described in several types of IAI, such as purulent, fecal, and secondary peritonitis [6-10].
Clinical study and management of secondary peritonitis due to perforated hollow viscous.
Primary peritonitis occurs mainly through haematogenous dissemination, secondary peritonitis is caused by resident flora subsequent to the loss of integrity of a hollow viscus, while non-responding secondary peritonitis either due to failure of the host inflammatory response or overwhelming superinfection leads to tertiary peritonitis.
Patients classified as having secondary peritonitis, which was diagnosed when one of the following features were present.
Secondary peritonitis is often caused by introduction of an infection into the otherwise sterile peritoneal environment through perforation of bowel, introduction of chemically irritating material such as gastric acid from a perforated ulcer.