secondary ossification center

secondary ossification center

[TA]
center of bone formation appearing later than the punctum ossificationis primarium, usually in epiphysis.

sec·on·dar·y os·si·fi·ca·tion cen·ter

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē os'i-fi-kā'shŭn sen'tĕr) [TA]
Center of bone formation that appears later than the primary ossification center, usually in an epiphysis.
Synonym(s): secondary center of ossification.
References in periodicals archive ?
[11,12] Nowadays, it appears that the combination of den' secondary ossification center with the odontoid base has not occurred.
(1) This fracture is more common in males, and occurs most often between the development of a secondary ossification center and its fusion during adolescence.
The tibial tuberosity develops from a secondary ossification center in the proximal tibia between 7 and 9 years of age [2, 6].
The "dense" area is actually a secondary ossification center of the calcaneus, not an indication of pathology.
The vertebral ring apophysis appears as a secondary ossification center at approximately 10 years of age.
The timing of appearance of elbow secondary ossification centers shows considerable diversity regarding age, gender, and race.
MMP13 is the major collagenase expressed in the primary and secondary ossification centers and drives endochondral ossification by degrading major cartilage components, such as type II collagen and aggrecan [27].
On the appearance and evolution of secondary ossification centers in the tibia of Gallus gallus (Linn.).
It is useful to x-ray both the injured and the unaffected elbows in skeletally immature athletes to compare secondary ossification centers. Little League elbow demonstrates a widening of the medial epicondyle physis, for example, when the x-rays are compared.
In adolescence, secondary ossification centers, which lie in the spinous process, transverse process, articular process, and the endplate of vertebral body, complete the growth of the vertebral column.
Secondary ossification centers located on the ends of the long bones are named epiphyses and those at the insertion site of a muscle are named apophyses.