secondary hemochromatosis

sec·on·dar·y he·mo·chro·ma·to·sis

increased intake and accumulation of iron secondary to known cause, such as oral iron therapy or multiple transfusions.

sec·on·dar·y he·mo·chro·ma·to·sis

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē hē'mŏ-krō'mă-tō'sis)
Increased intake and accumulation of iron secondary to known cause, such as oral iron therapy or multiple transfusions.
References in periodicals archive ?
In an Iranian study by Monajemzadeh showed that secondary hemochromatosis in patients with thalassemia composed the most prevalent diagnoses (17.5%) of chronic liver disease in the children27.
MRI of the abdomen demonstrated iron deposition in the liver and spleen compatible with secondary hemochromatosis. Liver biopsy documented increased iron uptake in the hepatocytes and Kupffer cells (Figure 1).
Iron accumulation within the thyroid can be seen in patients with hemosiderosis either due to primary or secondary hemochromatosis. Iron, however, typically manifests grossly as a ruddy or maroon discoloration and will stain positively with iron stains such as Prussian blue.
Prolonged and excessive iron ingestion and repeated blood transfusions that take place with hypoproliferative anemia and thalassemia may result in secondary hemochromatosis. However, in most cases, a concomitant disease resulting in hemochromatosis cannot be found, so the disease is termed HH.
Nosocomial Trichosporon asahii fungemia in a patient with secondary hemochromatosis: a rare case report.
Because patients with chronic liver diseases like hepatitis C may also harbor mutations associated with hereditary hemochromatosis, it may be impossible to distinguish hereditary from HCV-related or other causes of secondary hemochromatosis without genetic testing.
Secondary hemochromatosis. The hepcidin/ferritin ratio is also low in several secondary syndromes of iron overload characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, including thalassemia and congenital dyserythropoiesis type 1.
The patient received frequent blood transfusions and monthly intravenous deferoxamine for secondary hemochromatosis. Six days before admission to our hospital, necrotizing cellulitis of both legs, unresponsive to intravenous antimicrobial agents, was diagnosed at a local hospital.
Multiple blood transfusions at that time were complicated by hepatitis C with cirrhosis and secondary hemochromatosis, treated at home with twice weekly deferoxamine by subcutaneous central venous catheter.