secondary dysmenorrhea


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Related to secondary dysmenorrhea: adenomyosis, endometriosis, primary dysmenorrhea

sec·on·dar·y dys·men·or·rhe·a

dysmenorrhea due to inflammation, infection, tumor, or anatomic factors.

sec·on·dar·y dys·men·or·rhe·a

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē dis-men'ŏr-ē'ă)
Menstrual disorder due to inflammation, infection, tumor, or anatomic factors.

secondary dysmenorrhea

Painful menses that manifest some years after menarche and result from identifiable pelvic disorders or diseases. Common causes include a history or finding of use of an intrauterine device, pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, uterine leiomyomas, adenomyosis, fertility problems related to imperforate hymen, cervical stenosis, ovarian cysts, or pronounced uterine retroflexion and/or retroversion.

Treatment

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are recommended for pain management. Medical or surgical management is directed toward resolving the underlying problem.

See also: dysmenorrhea
References in periodicals archive ?
Behavioural interventions for primary and secondary dysmenorrhea. (Cochrane Review).
secondary dysmenorrhea (pelvic ultrasound, pap on the flora, PCR for infections, X-ray study of spine).
There are two types of dysmenorrhea: Primary dysmenorrhea with menstrual pain but without pelvic pathology occurring during ovulatory menstrual cycles and secondary dysmenorrhea with menstrual pain associated with pelvic pathology.
Furthermore, as it was reported by other studies (3,6,7,9,11), to decrease the severity of menstrual pain and to reduce the rate of absence from school, as well as to prevent the possibility of getting secondary dysmenorrhea, educating young girls in schools could be considered the most effective, most efficient, and most time-saving method.
Secondary dysmenorrhea is usually due to pelvic pathology and it is not common in adolescent girls.
However, a few studies reported that there was no connection between dysmenorrhea and irregular menstruation.16 An explanation for this difference could be as follows: the evaluation of primary and secondary dysmenorrhea together leads to different conclusions in terms of the relationship between menstrual irregularity and dysmenorrhea.

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