bond

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bond

 [bond]
the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

bond

(bond),
chemistry the force holding two neighboring atoms in place and resisting their separation; a bond is electrovalent if it consists of the attraction between oppositely charged groups, or covalent if it results from the sharing of one, two, or three pairs of electrons by the bonded atoms.
Chemistry A unit of chemical attraction; the ‘glue’ that maintains the molecules in their 3-D configuration—e.g., O2 has 2 bonds of affinity, which may be graphically represented by a short line or dash
Social medicine A binding force or influence; a cause of union; a uniting tie—e.g., bonds of fellowship

bond

(bond)
chemistry The force holding two neighboring atoms in place and resisting their separation; a bond is electrovalent if it consists of the attraction between oppositely charged groups, or covalent if it results from the sharing of one, two, or three pairs of electrons by the bonded atoms.

bond

  1. the force of mutual attraction that holds atoms together in molecules (see VAN DER WAALS INTERACTIONS and SULPHUR BRIDGE), such as high-energy bonds in ATP, weak hydrogen bonds in DNA, PEPTIDE BONDS and the disulphide bond of proteins.
  2. also called pair bond . The attraction which maintains a male/female relationship, for purposes of breeding, during the life cycle of some animals, mainly warmblooded vertebrates.

bond

(bond)
chemistry the force holding two neighboring atoms in place and resisting their separation.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Creating an active and efficient primary and secondary bond market is crucial to improving access to finance for companies in Egypt,' Mohamed Farid, senior financial economist at the Ministry of Investment, told Reuters in an interview on Thursday.
In the wake of the 2010 sovereign debt crisis in Europe, the ECB has set interest rates at historic lows and has entered secondary bond markets to buy tens of billions of euros in bonds off institutional investors each month, hoping to foster growth by keeping interest rates low, ease eurozone countries' debt burdens, and boost inflation.
The documents spell out rules for EFSF intervention on the primary and secondary bond markets, for extending precautionary credit lines to governments, leveraging its firepower and its investment and funding strategies.
Further liquidity would come when a derivatives market gets under way, likely in the second half of 2012, while the small secondary bond market, seen as vital to making fixed-income issuance more attractive for companies, should see progress in 2011, he said.
To get around this irritating limitation, the ECB, under OMT, announced it would buy government bonds only from secondary bond markets -- i.e.
A 3 billion euro Italian auction of five-year paper went smoothly on Monday at yields below those on the secondary bond market, but still the highest since the launch of the euro.
Thomson Reuters Capital Market Securities (Debt and Equity Capital Markets) data exclude non-firmly underwritten offerings, best efforts transactions, open market transactions that are structured around basket securities, Secondary Bond Offerings, transactions that mature in less than 360 days after settle ment, transactions with issue size less than US $1 million, and European domestic bonds.
Under APP, the ECB had been buying about 60 billion euros a month ($67 billion) in sovereign bonds from secondary bond markets -- i.e.