amide

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Related to secondary amide: primary amide, tertiary amide

amide

 [am´īd]
any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acyl radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the -OH group by -NH2.

am·ide

, primary amidesecondary amidetertiary amide (am'īd, am'id),
A substance derived from ammonia by replacing hydrogen atoms with acyl groups, R-CO-NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom results in formation of a primary amide; of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and of three hdyrogen atoms, a tertiary amide. Amides can also be derived from a carboxylic acid by replacing a carboxylic OH with NH2 from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amide; that of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and that of three atoms, a tertiary amide.

amide

/am·ide/ (am´īd) any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acid radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the sbondOH group by sbondNH2.

amide

(ăm′īd′, -ĭd)
n.
1. An organic compound, such as acetamide, containing the CONH2 group.
2. The anion of ammonia, NH2- or a compound containing this anion, such as sodium amide, NaNH2.

a·mid′ic (ə-mĭd′ĭk, ă-mĭd′-) adj.

amide

1 a chemical compound formed from an organic acid by the substitution of an amino (NH2, NHR, or NR2) group for the hydroxyl of a carboxyl (COOH) group.
2 a chemical compound formed by the deprotonation of ammonia (NH3) or a primary (RNH2) or secondary (R2NH) amine.

am·ide

(am'īd)
A substance formally derived from ammonia through the substitution of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by acyl groups, R-CO-NH2, or from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amide; that of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and that of three atoms, a tertiary amide.

amide

a compound formed from ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by a metal or acid radical.

am·ide

(am'īd)
A substance formally derived from ammonia through the substitution of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by acyl groups, R-CO-NH2, or from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2.

amide (am´īd),

n 1. an ammonia-derived organic compound formed through the displacement of a hydrogen atom by an acyl radical.
2. An ammonia-derived inorganic compound formed through the replacement of an acid's hydroxyl group (OH) with that of an amino group such as NH2.
3. type of local anesthetic agent. See also anesthetic, amide.

amide

any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acid radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the −OH group by −NH2.

amide compound herbicides
diphenamid and CDAA may cause poisoning if given in large doses. Signs include depression, weight loss and muscular weakness of the hindquarters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Secondary amides are sometimes chosen when balancing slip and antiblock properties is critical.
Introduced in the late 1990s, non-migratory slips have molecular weights 30 to 50 times greater than primary and secondary amides.
The performance of primary and secondary amides depends on many factors:
Non-migratory slips have a higher molecular weight than secondary amides and do not diffuse through a polymer matrix.
Crodamides are a line of fatty acid amides, which include primary amides (erucamide, oleamide, and stearamide), secondary amides (stearyl and oleyl erucamide, etc.
Crodamides are a line of fatty acid amides, which include primary amides (erucamide, oleamide, and stearmide), secondary amides (stearly and oley erucamide, etc.
Crodamides are a line fatty acid amides, which include primary amides (erucamide, oleamide, and stearamide), secondary amides (steary and oleyl erucamide, etc.