secondary

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secondary

(sĕk′ən-dĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Second or lower in rank or importance; not primary: concerns that are secondary.
2. Of, relating to, or being the shorter flight feathers projecting along the inner edge of a bird's wing.
3. Being a degree of health care intermediate between primary care and tertiary care, as that typically offered at a community hospital.
n. pl. secondar·ies
1. One that acts in an auxiliary, subordinate, or inferior capacity.
2. One of the shorter flight feathers projecting along the inner edge of a bird's wing.

sec′ond·ar′i·ly (-dâr′ə-lē) adv.
sec′ond·ar′i·ness n.

secondary

adjective
(1) Not primary; generally referring to that which follows another linked process.
(2) Metastatic, see there.
 
noun A metastatic focus of tumour.

secondary

adjective 
1. Not primary; generally that which follows another linked process.
2. Metastatic, see there.

sec·on·dar·y

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē)
1. Second in order.
2. Caused by another condition (e.g., a secondary infection caused by antibiotic treatment for a primary infection).

secondary

A disease or disorder that results from and follows another disease or a prior episode of the same disease. Secondary cancer is the occurrence of a METASTASIS at a site remote from that of the primary tumour. Since the tumour originated in a different tissue it may differ in character from a primary growth at the new site.

sec·on·dary

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē)
1. Second in order.
2. Caused by another condition (e.g., a secondary infection caused by antibiotic treatment for a primary infection).
References in periodicals archive ?
120 These are examples of a phenomenon which Mark Goodacre, in his as yet unpublished doctoral thesis, convincingly argues demonstrates Luke's secondariness to the other Synoptics.
This comes through especially in Virgil's sense of belatedness and secondariness with respect to all that comes after the Homeric age.
But if this poetic form refuses secondariness, it refuses primacy too: prosody emerges as neither hopefully emancipatory nor powerfully all-constraining.
Interestingly, here, Chedgzoy notes that the "language of secondariness and insubstantialness articulates the melancholia of unresolved mourning at least as much as it expresses a simply gendered self-deprecation" (155).
Noting this secondariness of myth, Cornell argues for the feminist reliance upon myth to defend the feminine (Beyond Accommodation 165).
That section begins with Florio's introduction to his translation of Montaigne, "all translations are reputed femalls, delivered at second hand." The identification of femaleness with secondariness, however, is not an historical constant, much less the occasion for a transhistorical frame.
Bulawayo people have always shaped their identity around the notion of being peripheral, of being drought stricken, for example, and, at different times, of political secondariness. The landscape is very distinct, flat for distances, and the thornbushes are scattered everywhere in its sparse vegetation, blooming when they can.
I still counter-argue, however, that in Re's monograph the very analytical case, excellently defended by the critic but to the exclusion of all else (singularly, the inquiry contents itself with Sentiero), can often sound more classic or epochal (that is, Fascism-Resistance related) than truly Calvinian because of the secondariness of Re's interest in the textual dynamics.
Oldmixon for a debt, Lintott becomes the very image of errance and the very embodiment of secondariness. Lintott's enterprise is folly, failure, and illusion; Lintott is redoutable no more.
They are as it were in solution in her vocabulary despite their secondariness. Yet it is the empirical processes of technology that are rejected, even when the camera lens, as well as the telescopic lens in this maritime sonnet, is latent in her language: it is the intellectual and mental aspect of fixing that is important to her, but the vocabulary hints at the technology of the camera all the same:
The despair of the former has a sense of triumph, while the triumph of the latter contains defeat, celebrating a union in which one lover (the man) is subordinate, secondary, to the other - a secondariness counter to the authority of dramatic monologue form.
Precisely because his narrative game enables him to deny his own secondariness in the face of the paintings as well as the treatises, he can get away with ignoring the paintings' first personhood.