second-generation antipsychotic


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second-generation antipsychotic

An antipsychotic drug that causes increased appetite, weight gain, and adverse effects on lipids. They differ from first-generation antipsychotics in that they are less likely to cause extrapyramidal side effects or tardive dyskinesia.
Synonym: atypical antipsychotic
See also: antipsychotic
References in periodicals archive ?
Open access to second-generation antipsychotic medications was granted as of October 1, 1997.
Typically, high-potency first-generation antipsychotics such as trifluoperazine and haloperidol are frequently associated with NMS as compared to the second-generation antipsychotics [1, 2].
From an anamnestic standpoint, he denies neuroleptic impregnation in the past, in the context of the treatment with first-generation antipsychotics and second-generation antipsychotics.
To address the issue of the differential effects of first-generation and second-generation antipsychotic medications on sexual functioning, we identified patients who had been taking first-generation or second-generation medication for at least one year at the time of enrollment and compared their results on the ASEX.
A meta-analysis of head-to-head comparisons of second-generation antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia.
Second-generation antipsychotics can cause weight gain, and some data suggest that these drugs may have direct effects on insulin resistance and the risk for diabetes, independent of body mass index.
However, clozapine is inexpensive, and hence it is unprofitable for the pharmaceutical industry to market compared with other second-generation antipsychotic drugs.
A wide range of medications including sympathomimetic amines, central nervous system stimulants and executive function agents, first-generation antipsychotic drugs, second-generation antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants, mood stabilisers, antianxiety drugs, and some miscellaneous drugs are covered in different chapters.
Although clozapine has the potential to cause severe side-effects, there is increasing evidence to advocate its use in the early treatment of first-episode patients whose psychosis does not remit with other second-generation antipsychotics. (1) It has been suggested that clozapine should be positioned as a second-line treatment for first-episode schizophrenics who fail one trial of a second-generation antipsychotic.
However, even the metformin-alone group showed improvements, and if our patients can reliably take their second-generation antipsychotic, they should also be able to take metformin reliably.
Findings from a study of olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone in patients with Alzheimer's disease call into question the clinical value of these second-generation antipsychotic drugs and suggest that physicians should use them judiciously.