second-generation antipsychotic


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second-generation antipsychotic

An antipsychotic drug that causes increased appetite, weight gain, and adverse effects on lipids. They differ from first-generation antipsychotics in that they are less likely to cause extrapyramidal side effects or tardive dyskinesia.
Synonym: atypical antipsychotic
See also: antipsychotic
References in periodicals archive ?
She presented what she believes to be the first prospective observational study comparing weight gain between antipsychotic-naive children and adults during their first 6 months on second-generation antipsychotics.
To address the issue of the differential effects of first-generation and second-generation antipsychotic medications on sexual functioning, we identified patients who had been taking first-generation or second-generation medication for at least one year at the time of enrollment and compared their results on the ASEX.
Reasons for switching from first-generation antipsychotic to second-generation antipsychotic
Second-generation antipsychotics can cause weight gain, and some data suggest that these drugs may have direct effects on insulin resistance and the risk for diabetes, independent of body mass index.
While the proportional use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs was found to rise from 13 to 64 per cent during follow-up, the gap in life expectancy from age 20 years between patients with schizophrenia and the general population did not widen between 1996 and 2006.
In October 1997, Medi-Cal granted open access to three second-generation antipsychotic medications: risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine.
Patients who received lithium plus APT were not given second-generation antipsychotics, while those given quetiapine plus APT were not given lithium or any other second-generation antipsychotic.
While both the classification and relative efficacies of the so-called 'typical' first-generation antipsychotic (FGA) agents, such as haloperidol and chlorpromazine, and 'atypical' second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) compounds, such as risperidone and olanzapine, remain controversial, current evidence supports the following:
Relationship between second-generation antipsychotic medications and metabolic abnormalities.
The complaint filed by the attorney general involves a drug called Risperdal, a second-generation antipsychotic prescription drug, which was launched by Janssen in 1994.
However, even the metformin-alone group showed improvements, and if our patients can reliably take their second-generation antipsychotic, they should also be able to take metformin reliably.