seamless

(redirected from seamlessness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

seamless

adjective Referring to a smooth and seemingly uninterrupted transition from one task, protocol or format of operation to another, for example, in translating virtual reality simulations of endoscopic surgery into clinical practice, or changing one diagnostic or therapeutic method to another.

seamless

Vox populi adjective Referring to a smooth and seemingly uninterrupted transition from one task to another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, while such seamlessness announces extraordinarily skilled fabrication, it also preserves associations with craft and commerce that are perhaps no longer desirable.
He favors a constant flow of movement much like the liquid seamlessness found in ice skating, which he readily admits has had an influence on his work.
These solutions further the seamlessness of the installation phase of projects, thereby helping companies reduce costs and improve productivity within their work.
JOHN BALDESSARI: There is a kind of seamlessness to your work.
Filtered into the everyday, Koller's idea-actions suspend or interrupt its seamlessness, applying to it a touch of virtuality.
Given the seamlessness of Raad's self-presentation, in his performances and his prose, and the amount of control he exercises over every detail of the project's composition and dissemination--continually retitling and refiling the work, revising biographies and histories--it's not surprising that much of the recent critical attention has focused narrowly on the nature of its authorship.
Of all the problems generated by the supershow scale, the curatorial ambition as such is less pertinent than the almost inevitable urge to create effects of evidence through the matic clustering: Archive, city, model, border, textuality, encyclopedism, violence, postcolonialism, carnival, labyrinth, and so many other classificatory aids tend to support a narrative of contiguities and seamlessness rather than one of disruptions and constructions (in Ranciere's sense of the political).
This seamlessness was helped along by the decision to omit the two city-specific tendencies that have dominated American painting of late: neo-rococo portraiture from New York, as practiced by John Currin, Lisa Yuskavage, Elizabeth Peyton, Kurt Kauper, et al., and the askew formalism that's been emanating from LA in works by Laura Owens, Monique Prieto, Kevin Appel, and Ingrid Calame, many of whom had their first significant solo shows after 1995, the starting point curator Mark Sladen set for the Barbican's selection.