seagull


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seagull

a noisy, gregarious bird that frequents the seashore. Web-footed, hook-billed, white with gray wings. Member of the family Laridae and of the genus Larus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quite often the seagulls will sort of swoop over you and if you're a small child and a thing with a three-foot wingspan comes towards you like a pterodacytl you might just throw your food up in the air," he added.
To try to put a stop to the gulls' unruly behaviour, the campaign Don't Feed the Seagulls proposes to try to discourage people from feeding the birds.
That's primarily the goal for drug users, according to Seagulls founder and executive director Ed Castillo.
Kirsty Park, professor in biological and environmental sciences at Stirling University, said there is not enough evidence to know why the seagull population is growing.
The identity of the seagull remains unknown but outreach leaders are trying to find the whereabouts of Twitter's @Cardiff-Seagull, who was very well connected in the capital but hasn't tweeted in three years.
Seagulls have long been considered a nuisance by residents in the north-east.
Birds of prey are set to patrol streets of Beaumaris in a bid to alleviate the town's problem with "dangerous" and "aggressive" seagulls, which have been seen flying off with steaks and sandwiches from diners' plates at some of the town's eateries.
Indeed, seagulls have been frequently witnessed in the Bulgarian capital over the past few years.
It's about a seagull that is more than just a seagull.
In addition, Seagull may also provide a further amount dependent on the eventual future sale of a majority in Alpitour by its investors.
It is an offence to kill or injure a seagull under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.
THE Silver Seagull award was presented annually for the best essay on environmental issues and animal care from a pupil.