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scribe

(skrīb),
1. To write, trace, or mark by making a line with a marker or pointed instrument, as in surveying a dental cast for a removable prosthesis.
2. To form, by instrumentation, negative areas within a master cast to provide a positive beading in the framework of a removable partial denture, or the posterior palatal seal area for a complete denture.
[L. scribo, pp. scripto, to write]

scribe

(skrīb)
1. To write, trace, or mark by making a line with a marker or pointed instrument, as in surveying a dental cast for a removable prosthesis.
2. To form, by instrumentation, negative areas within a master cast to provide a positive beading in framework of a removable partial denture, or posterior palatal seal area for a complete denture.
[L. scribo, pp. scripto, to write]
References in periodicals archive ?
Implicit in the Zuo passage is the notion that standardized scribal rules such as the one prescribed here should be equated with "ritual guidelines." But Du Yu goes further than the Zuo to 1) give these scribal/ritual guidelines a terminology, calling them fanli [phrase omitted] (general norms); 2) attribute them to the Duke of Zhou; and 3) state that they are all already "inscribed" on important historical records.
Instead, the Press opted for a modest design that further distanced print from earlier scribal influence.
Although he can sometimes appear overly dismissive of opposing arguments, the close attention to detail and inductive reasoning that Neidorf so painstakingly employs supplies convincing evidence about important questions such as the unity and dating of the poem as well as scribal practices and contemporary reception.
In recording such practical information along with the more literary contents of his book, Hanson reflected a stage not only in the transition from an oral to a scribal culture, but also in the formation of a burgeoning "public" for painting (especially portraiture and wall painting), and for the associated genres of heraldry and calligraphy.
(52) Harold Love, The Culture and Commerce of Texts: Scribal Publication in Seventeenth-Century England (Amherst, 1998), 121.
Part Two of the book, "The Scribe and Literacy," expands on the abovecited BASOR article ("Scribal Education in Ancient Israel") to provide the author's detailed refutation both of those who would assert that ancient Israel had virtually universal literacy and those who would deny that Israel had formal education of any recognizable kind.
In addition, Bongie affirms that Glissant's scribal work for Jacques Chirac's government evokes the intellectual as a janus-figure both distant and close to power.
Indeed, her treatment of formularies in the contexts of literacy, orality, and scribal activity makes the book methodologically useful for anyone concerned with the production and reception of texts before printing.
Take everything From life but Give nothing To biography You enact The deed of presence You pass Into manifestation Scholium: "Poems create poets" This passage highlights the logic of a scribal poetics.
In chapter five, Cyrus also offers an important contribution to the study of late-medieval women's devotion and scribal activity, which has often focused on the intellectual and literary impact of reform.
Another useful innovation is the use of /...\ for subscript, and \.../ for superscript scribal additions.
A central argument of the book is that there were two principal modes of publication available to the colonists, each with its own advantages and risks: scribal publication (handwritten copies of text), and printed publication.