screen

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screen

 [skrēn]
1. a framework or agent used as a shield or protector; called also protectant and protective.
2. to separate well individuals in a population from those who have an undiagnosed disease, defect, or other pathologic condition or who are at high risk by means of tests, examinations, or other procedures. See also screening.
Bjerrum screen tangent screen.
fluoroscopic screen a phosphorescent screen that shows the movement and relationship of organs and structures in fluoroscopy.
intensifying screen a fluorescent screen used in conjunction with x-ray film to enhance the effect of the radiation and reduce dosage to the patient. The screen must be matched to the emissivity range; the emissivity of phosphorus is similar to that of the human eye, so that phosphors absorb x-ray energy and convert it to visible light.
tangent screen a large square of black cloth with a central mark for fixation; used with a campimeter in mapping the field of vision.

screen

(skrēn),
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
See also: screen memory.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
See also: screen memory.
3. Formerly, to make a fluoroscopic examination.
See also: screen memory.
4. In psychoanalysis, concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory.
5. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
6. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
[Fr. écran]

screen

(skrēn)
n.
1. A movable device that serves to protect, conceal, or divide.
2. A surface or device on which an image is displayed for viewing.
3. A screen memory.
v.
1. To process a group of people in order to select or separate certain individuals from it.
2. To test or examine for the presence of disease or infection.
3. To subject to genetic screening.

screen

Molecular biology
verb To detect a phenotype’s presence or absence by testing for growth under different conditions (e.g., plus and minus an auxotrophic supplement or permissive and non-permissive conditions), usually done by replica plating or patching colonies onto each type of plate.
 
Public health
noun
(1) Any systematic activity—e.g., measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol; pap smear; or other activity—which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population.
(2) A popular term for a solar protection barrier.

screen

Public health
1. Any systematic activity–eg, measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol, pap smear, or other activity, which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population. See Drug screen, General health screen, Laxative screen, Memory Impairment screen, Metabolic screen, Neonatal screen.
2. A solar protection barrier. See Sunscreen.

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence (e.g., heat, light, x-rays).
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. psychoanalysis Concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory
4. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
5. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
6. To examine for the presence or absence of specified characteristics to determine whether further examination is needed.
[Fr. écran]

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate some individuals from it.
Synonym(s): screening (1).
[Fr. écran]
References in periodicals archive ?
Initially, typical screeners used in powder primer application required an electronic sensing device to detect if they had blocked and needed servicing.
The ball-handler can see what side the screener sets up on and at what angle, but the defender on the ball cannot.
The treatment of airport screeners is the touchstone for this new world, where the Administration's antilabor agenda is at its most naked.
An important feature of Screener Condenser is standardized assay annotation for structuring and storing today's large collections of screening data sets in pharmaceutical companies.
Screeners can decide there is no case to answer or call for an assessment of a doctor's practice, in which case a panel - usually a case co-ordinator, lay person and two specialists - examines the evidence via case records and interviews.
Blanca Gallegos, a spokesperson for SEIU Local 1877, says the problem is that "many times the supervisors and managers at the checkpoints really just have a few more months' experience than the people they're supervising." And this particular screener, who has been on the job for 10 months, is already a veteran employee: At LAX, says Gallegos, the average screener lasts just nine months.
The team's report yesterday cited low pay as being the primary cause for poor morale among screeners and large numbers of unfilled jobs.