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screen

 [skrēn]
1. a framework or agent used as a shield or protector; called also protectant and protective.
2. to separate well individuals in a population from those who have an undiagnosed disease, defect, or other pathologic condition or who are at high risk by means of tests, examinations, or other procedures. See also screening.
Bjerrum screen tangent screen.
fluoroscopic screen a phosphorescent screen that shows the movement and relationship of organs and structures in fluoroscopy.
intensifying screen a fluorescent screen used in conjunction with x-ray film to enhance the effect of the radiation and reduce dosage to the patient. The screen must be matched to the emissivity range; the emissivity of phosphorus is similar to that of the human eye, so that phosphors absorb x-ray energy and convert it to visible light.
tangent screen a large square of black cloth with a central mark for fixation; used with a campimeter in mapping the field of vision.

screen

(skrēn),
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
See also: screen memory.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
See also: screen memory.
3. Formerly, to make a fluoroscopic examination.
See also: screen memory.
4. In psychoanalysis, concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory.
5. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
6. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
[Fr. écran]

screen

(skrēn)
n.
1. A movable device that serves to protect, conceal, or divide.
2. A surface or device on which an image is displayed for viewing.
3. A screen memory.
v.
1. To process a group of people in order to select or separate certain individuals from it.
2. To test or examine for the presence of disease or infection.
3. To subject to genetic screening.

screen

Molecular biology
verb To detect a phenotype’s presence or absence by testing for growth under different conditions (e.g., plus and minus an auxotrophic supplement or permissive and non-permissive conditions), usually done by replica plating or patching colonies onto each type of plate.
 
Public health
noun
(1) Any systematic activity—e.g., measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol; pap smear; or other activity—which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population.
(2) A popular term for a solar protection barrier.

screen

Public health
1. Any systematic activity–eg, measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol, pap smear, or other activity, which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population. See Drug screen, General health screen, Laxative screen, Memory Impairment screen, Metabolic screen, Neonatal screen.
2. A solar protection barrier. See Sunscreen.

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence (e.g., heat, light, x-rays).
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. psychoanalysis Concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory
4. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
5. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
6. To examine for the presence or absence of specified characteristics to determine whether further examination is needed.
[Fr. écran]

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate some individuals from it.
Synonym(s): screening (1).
[Fr. écran]
References in periodicals archive ?
From a processing standpoint, sands to be used in soil amendments must be processed to a high degree of consistency, so they are typically screened. A significant issue with respect to the manufactured soils markets is regulatory approval.
It is reassuring that the prostate cancer mortality rate ratios for screened and unscreened populations did not vary considerably (0.74 to 0.84) between study centres (countries).
Norrkoping[sup.5,6] did not originally include PSA screening; Quebec[sup.7,8] had very poor compliance with screening; and Stockholm[sup.14] screened patients only once and had a PSA threshold for biopsy higher than present standards.
Of the 1849 men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the Goteborg trial, 829 progressed to radical prostatectomy.[sup.29] The sub-study, examining the harm associated with radical prostatectomy, found that for every 10 000 men screened over 14 years, 34 prostate cancer deaths will be prevented (number needed to screen: 293) at the cost of 120 more men with impotence or sexual inactivity, and 25 more men with urinary incontinence.[sup.29] The cost-effectiveness and quality-of-life information remains unclear, but will likely further complicate the ability to make clear recommendations for broad population-based screening.
In April 2004, Royster-Clark conducted another manufacturing test using 100 tons of ground, screened drywall gypsum.
We used health department records to determine which children in this cohort were screened for lead exposure from 1 January 1996 through 31 December 1997 to assess the effectiveness of the Jefferson County CLPP in reaching at-risk children.
We then expanded the study cohort to include all children younger than 7 years of age who were screened by the Jefferson County CLPP from 1994 through 1998 to assess the ability of GIS to identify neighborhoods and specific housing units in need of special attention for remediation.
This project required tabular data on births, children screened for lead exposure, and individual housing construction dates, as well as home construction dates aggregated by census tract and zip code.
Thus we were able to assign 491 (20%) of the 2,507 births and 364 (29%) of the 1,238 children screened during the 1996-1997 time period to the pre-1950 housing age category.
The difference may stem from earlier detection of cancers in screened women, says study coauthor Steven J.
Currently, some women with a family risk of ovarian cancer are screened every 2 to 3 years.
military, where applicants are routinely screened for HIV infection.