scorpion sting


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

scorpion sting

[skôr′pē·on]
Etymology: Gk, skorpios + AS, stingan
a painful wound produced by a scorpion, an arachnid with a hollow stinger in its tail. The stings of many species are only slightly toxic, but some, including Centruroides sculpturatus (bark scorpion) of the southwestern United States, may inflict fatal injury, especially in small children. Initial pain is followed within several hours by numbness, nausea, muscle spasm, dyspnea, and convulsion. Anascorp, an antivenin, was approved for use in the United States in 2011. The antivenin has been available in Mexico for many years.
enlarge picture
Scorpion
A toxic systemic response to scorpion venom
Management Antivenom from poison control centers in the southwestern US; also immobilization, ice water immersion, oxygen, ventilation; opiate analgesics may potentiate venom toxicity, and should be avoided; atropine is used to combat parasympathetic effects

scorpion sting

A toxic systemic response to scorpion venom Clinical SOB, opisthotonus, nasal and periorbital itching, dysphasia, drooling, gastric distension, diplopia, transient blindness, nystagmus, fecal & urinary incontinence, penile erection, HTN, arrhythmias, lasting up to 48 hrs Management Antivenom from poison control centers; also immobilization, ice water immersion, oxygen, ventilation; opiate analgesics may potentiate venom toxicity, should be avoided; atropine is used to combat parasympathetic effects. See Scorpion.

scorpion sting

Injury resulting from scorpion venom. The stings of most species in the U.S. seldom produce severe toxic reactions, but because of the difficulty of distinguishing one species of scorpion from another, each scorpion sting should be treated as if it had been inflicted by a species capable of delivering a very toxic dose of venom. The stings vary in severity from local tissue reactions consisting of swelling and pain at the puncture site, to systemic reactions that compromise breathing and neuromuscular function. Death may rarely occur (e.g., in very young children).

Treatment

For mild local reactions, cold compresses and antihistamines are sufficient. Severe reactions may need to be treated with airway management, antivenins, and intensive observation in the hospital. For the source of local antivenins, the use of which is controversial, contact the nearest poison control center.

See also: sting
References in periodicals archive ?
Surveying the scorpion sting agents at Khuzestan (a province of Iran) in 2004.
Study done by PK Devarbhavi et al has shown that hypertension is one of the commonest cardiovascular manifestations of scorpion sting envenomation; this is due to massive outpouring of catecholamines from adrenal medulla and also from postganglionic neurons.
Scorpion sting is one of the major health problems of developing tropical and sub tropical countries that cause wide effects on human, including from severe local skin reactions to create a nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory problems and sometimes death.
KEY WORDS: Scorpion sting, pain, tachycardia, pulmonary edema
Scorpion sting is associated with ECG changes, including increased PR interval, QT dispersion, corrected QpT value and Pmin.
Scorpion stings are common in Iran, particularly in the southern and southwest regions of the country, and they pose a serious health problem.
Scorpionism, scorpion sting, is a world-wide spread phenomenon but It is a considerable health problem in the tropical and subtropical regions.
In the central-southern region of Mexico, especially in the states of Morelos and Guerrero, there is a high incidence of poisonous scorpion stings (Dehesa-Davila et al.
With the aim to determine the toxinologic, clinical and epidemiological features of scorpion stings and of experimental envenoming induced by T.
All consecutive children admitted with history of "Definite" scorpion sting were recruited.