scorpion sting


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
A toxic systemic response to scorpion venom
Management Antivenom from poison control centers in the southwestern US; also immobilization, ice water immersion, oxygen, ventilation; opiate analgesics may potentiate venom toxicity, and should be avoided; atropine is used to combat parasympathetic effects
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

scorpion sting

A toxic systemic response to scorpion venom Clinical SOB, opisthotonus, nasal and periorbital itching, dysphasia, drooling, gastric distension, diplopia, transient blindness, nystagmus, fecal & urinary incontinence, penile erection, HTN, arrhythmias, lasting up to 48 hrs Management Antivenom from poison control centers; also immobilization, ice water immersion, oxygen, ventilation; opiate analgesics may potentiate venom toxicity, should be avoided; atropine is used to combat parasympathetic effects. See Scorpion.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

scorpion sting

Injury resulting from scorpion venom. The stings of most species in the U.S. seldom produce severe toxic reactions, but because of the difficulty of distinguishing one species of scorpion from another, each scorpion sting should be treated as if it had been inflicted by a species capable of delivering a very toxic dose of venom. The stings vary in severity from local tissue reactions consisting of swelling and pain at the puncture site, to systemic reactions that compromise breathing and neuromuscular function. Death may rarely occur (e.g., in very young children).

Treatment

For mild local reactions, cold compresses and antihistamines are sufficient. Severe reactions may need to be treated with airway management, antivenins, and intensive observation in the hospital. For the source of local antivenins, the use of which is controversial, contact the nearest poison control center.

See also: sting
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there are many studies in literature about the effects of scorpion stings and venom, there is limited information on the fetal-maternal effects of scorpion venom in pregnancy.
Demyelinating polyneuropathy following scorpion sting envenomation; a case report and review of literature.
Surveying the scorpion sting agents at Khuzestan (a province of Iran) in 2004.
This study showed that scorpion sting was more common in age group of 2-6 years and male children were more commonly affected than female children.
Conclusions: Since there is a large number of cases with a history of previous scorpion stings, it appears we can reduc e the incidence of this occurrence using education of preventing and control ways from this phenomenon to persons referred to treatment in the studied area and repeat those in similar regions with high range of scorpion sting.
Conclusion: Scorpion sting is an acute life-threatening emergency, and an early presentation to the hospital.
The studied parametres were: age, gender, location of scorpion sting in the body, symptoms, and findings and treatment; and the heart rate (HR), PR interval, QRS, prolonged Corrected QT interval (UQTc), corrected shortened QT interval (KQTc), QT dispersion (QTd), corrected QpT value (QpTc), minimum P wave duration (Pmin), maximum P wave duration (Pmax), and P wave dispersion (PWd) were computed and ECG changes were recorded.
In Brazil, the registering system of scorpion stings was established in 1988 and, since then, the number of cases has increased significantly.
Pandey, "Scorpion sting envenomation presenting with pulmonary edema in adults: a report of seven cases from Nepal," Indian Journal of Medical Sciences, vol.
Surveying of scorpion sting and snake bite during 2001-2005, Centre of Management of Preventing and Fighting with the Diseases, Iranian Ministry of Health, Tehran.