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score

 [skor]
a rating, usually expressed numerically, based on specific achievement or the degree to which certain qualities are manifest.
APACHE score (acute physiological assessment and chronic health evaluation) a widely used method for assessing severity of illness in acutely ill patients in intensive care units, taking into account a variety of routine physiological parameters.
Apgar score a numerical expression of an infant's condition at birth, based on heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color; see also apgar score.
Bishop score a score for estimating the prospects of induction of labor, arrived at by evaluating the extent of cervical dilatation, effacement, the station of the fetal head, consistency of the cervix, and the cervical position in relation to the vaginal axis.
Silverman-Andersen score a system for evaluating the breathing of premature infants; see also Silverman-Andersen score.
stroke score any of various scoring systems that seek to characterize a patient's clinical state following a stroke.
trauma score a rating system used in the evaluation of patients with traumatic injury. Scores range from 1 to 15, with lower scores being associated with higher mortality rates.

score

(skōr),
An evaluation, usually expressed numerically, of status, achievement, or condition in a given set of circumstances.
[M. E. scor, notch, tally]

score

(skor) a rating, usually expressed numerically, based on specific achievement or the degree to which certain qualities or conditions are present.
APACHE score  [a cute p hysiological a ssessment and c hronic h ealth e valuation] a widely-used method for assessing severity of illness in acutely ill patients in intensive care units, taking into account a variety of routine physiological parameters.
Apgar score  a numerical expression of an infant's condition, usually determined at 60 seconds after birth, based on heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color.
Bishop score  a score for estimating the prospects of induction of labor, arrived at by evaluating the extent of cervical dilatation, effacement, the station of the fetal head, consistency of the cervix, and the cervical position in relation to the vaginal axis.

score

Drug slang
verb A regional term meaning to purchase or receive illicit drugs.

Health legislation
noun A report by the Congressional Budget Office that evaluates the economic impact of legislation (e.g., that of healthcare reform). The score obtained may determine the fate of a legislative proposal.

Molecular biology
verb To screen for a phenotype by testing for growth under different conditions (e.g., plus and minus an auxotrophic supplement, or permissive and nonpermissive conditions) usually done by replica plating or patching colonies onto each type of plate.
 
Pharmacology
verb To place a transverse linear attenuation on a flat cylindrical pill to facilitate breaking it in half.
 
Vox populi
noun A numeric rating of a particular process.

score

noun Health legislation Economic impact report A report by the Congressional Budget Office that evaluates the economic impact of legislation–eg, that of health care reform; the score obtained via projective prestidigitation may determine the fate of a legislative proposal. See Scorecard, Scorekeeper. Cf Report card Vox populi A numeric rating of a particular process. See APGAR score, Apopnea-hypopnea score, ASIA motor score, Borg score, Child-Pugh score, DeMeester score, Fagerstrom tolerance score, Family Environment score, Gleason score, Hachinski ischemic score, Hegsted's score, Lod score, Longitudinality score, Mayo risk score, Medicus modified score, Modified Bournemouth score, Nursing Classification score, Pediatric trauma score, Pittsburgh brainstem score, PRISM score, QRS score, Revised Trauma score, Sanitation score, SAPS II, Trauma score, Z score, Z score verb Drug slang To purchase illicit drugs Vox populi To get a home run; to get lucky.

score

(skōr)
An evaluation, usually expressed numerically, of status, achievement, or condition in a given set of circumstances.
[M. E. scor, notch, tally]

score

a rating, usually expressed numerically, based on specific achievement or the degree to which certain qualities are manifest.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rooney, who recently scored twice in a 2-0 win against West Ham United to take his tally to 212 goals, is currently the third highest goal scorer of United.
A top scorer from Mumbai took the classes," the scorer told M AIL T ODAY .
West End were top scorers in Division One, coming out 7-2 winners against Cwmbran Celtic with Darren Griffiths, Sam Brown and Jeff Aspinall netting two each.
On that occasion, Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service won a bronze medal in karate for their efforts, but Scorer is desperate to go one step further this time.
I was the scorer during the 1981 double wicket tournament between Gavaskar XI and Miandad XI at the Sharjah Cricket Stadium.
The plaque reads: "Councillor Scorer, a universally respected Labour councillor from 1971.
Freddy Osorio, of the CHS varsity boys soccer team, is the sixth-leading scorer in Division D of the Midland-Wachusett League with seven goals and one assist, and is the team's leading scorer.
Long gone are the days when a touring side would bring their own scorer so, in keeping with recent tra-dition55-year-old Steve will be the man in the statistical hotseat for Australia for the third Ashes Test.
Experiencing the Heart of Christianity--A 12 Session Program for Groups Tim Scorer Wood Lake Books
Youngest Everton debutant, youngest Everton scorer, youngest Premiership scorer, and, the one neglected, youngest scorer on his debut.
As a kid growing up in the New York area, I remember Mel Allen or Red Barber always revealing the name of the official scorer as casually as they would tell you who the umpires were for that game.
It has been proven to agree with the expert human scorer between 87%-94% of the time--about the same as any two expert human scorers.