scopolamine


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scopolamine

 [sko-pol´ah-mēn]
an anticholinergic and antimuscarinic alkaloid derived from various plants, having a depressant effect on the central nervous system. Used as an antisialagogue preanesthetic medication and as an adjunct to general anesthesia, administered parenterally; as an antiemetic, administered orally or parenterally; and as a cycloplegic and mydriatic, applied topically to the conjunctiva. Called also hyoscine.

sco·pol·a·mine

(skō-pol'ă-mēn, -min),
An alkaloid found in the leaves and seeds of Hyoscyamus niger, Duboisia myoproides, Scopolia japonica, S. carniolica, Atropa belladonna, and other solanaceous plants; exerts anticholinergic actions similar to that of atropine, but is thought to have greater central nervous system effects; useful in preventing motion sickness; available as various salts.
Synonym(s): hyoscine

scopolamine

/sco·pol·a·mine/ (sko-pol´ah-mēn) an anticholinergic alkaloid obtained from various solanaceous plants; used as the base or the hydrobromide salt as an antiemetic and as the hydrobromide salt as a preanesthetic antisialagogue, adjunct to general anesthesia, and topical mydriatic and cycloplegic.

scopolamine

(skə-pŏl′ə-mēn′, -mĭn)
n.
An alkaloid drug, C17H21NO4, extracted from plants such as henbane and used primarily to treat motion sickness and nausea and to dilate the pupil. Also called hyoscine.

scopolamine

[skōpol′əmēn]
Etymology: Giovanni A. Scopoli, Italian naturalist, 1723-1788
an anticholinergic alkaloid obtained from the leaves and seeds of several solanaceous plants. It is a central nervous system depressant.
indications It is prescribed for prevention of motion sickness and as an antiemetic, a sedative in obstetrics, and a cycloplegic and mydriatic.
contraindications Narrow-angle glaucoma, asthma, myasthenia gravis, obstruction of the genitourinary or GI tract, severe ulcerative colitis, and known hypersensitivity prohibit its use.
adverse effects Among the more serious adverse effects are blurred vision, central nervous system effects, tachycardia, dry mouth, decreased sweating, and hypersensitivity reaction. Also called hyoscine. See also transdermal scopolamine.

scopolamine

®Therapeutics An atropine-like anticholinergic–or antimuscarinic, used in preanesthesia, where CNS depression is desirable, GI tract antispasmodic, to ↑ heart rate, and counteract vasodilation and low BP caused by choline esters Metabolism GI tract absorption,12 metabolized in liver, remainder in kidneys Adverse efects Dry mouth, tachycardia, palpitation, pupillary dilatation, blurring of vision, headache, dry
hot skin

sco·pol·a·mine

(skō-pol'ă-mēn)
An alkaloid found in the leaves and seeds of Hyoscyamus niger, and other solanaceous plants; exerts anticholinergic actions similar to that of atropine, but thought to have greater central nervous system effects; useful in preventing motion sickness; available as various salts.
Synonym(s): hyoscine.

scopolamine

An ATROPINE-like drug used in premedication as a sedative and to dry up respiratory and salivary secretions.

sco·pol·a·mine

(skō-pol'ă-mēn, -min)
An alkaloid found in the leaves and seeds of various plants; exerts anticholinergic actions similar to that of atropine, but is thought to have greater central nervous system effects; useful in preventing motion sickness.
Synonym(s): hyoscine.

scopolamine (skōpol´əmēn),

n an alkaloid found in the leaves and seeds of
Atropa belladonna and other solanaceous plants having an action similar to atropine and used when spasmolytic or antisecretory effects are desired.
scopolamine, transdermal,
brand names: Transderm-Scōp, Transderm-V;
drug class: antiemetic, anticholinergic;
action: competitive antagonism of acetylcholine at receptor sites in the eye, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, glandular cells; inhibition of vestibular input to the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in inhibition of vomiting reflex;
use: prevention of motion sickness.

scopolamine

an anticholinergic alkaloid derived from various plants, used as the hydrobromide in parasympathetic blockade and as a central nervous system depressant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Etude de la teneur en hyoscyamine et en scopolamine d'une population sauvage de Datura stramonium L en Algerie.
With this in mind, in this study, we have examined the effect of PA on scopolamine (Scop)-induced memory impairment in mice and investigated the potential mechanisms involved.
Key words: Bioreactor, roots culture, tropane alkaloids, scopolamine, Brugmansia candida.
Histamine H(3)-receptor antagonism improves memory retention and reverses the cognitive deficit induced by scopolamine in a two-trial place recognition task.
In order to limit saliva production, a scopolamine transdermal release system was applied to the hairless skin overlying the parotid region.
These oils were also correlated to attenuation of lipid peroxidation due to scopolamine treatment and an absence of DNA cleavage patterns in the temporal lobe region.
As deficiencies of brain acetylcholine and decreasing in the neurotransmitter synthesis have been accounted as common features in Alzheimer's disease (AD), scopolamine has been one of the most used drugs to induce animal models of AD (2).
In contrast, impaired ability in emotional recognition has been studied extensively in other related domains, including Alzheimer's disease (McLellan, Johnson, Dalrymple-Alford, & Poeter, 2008), Huntington's disease (Grey, Young, Barker, Curtis, & Gibson, 1997), and the use of scopolamine, an anticholinergic agent (Kamboj & Curran, 2006a).
Typically, a rat treated with scopolamine will never learn the location of a submerged platform in a water tank, orienting with cues outside the tank.
Robert Ernest House, an obstetrician from Houston, Texas, had been using scopolamine on his patients to produce "twilight sleep" during labor.
Intrasalivary gland BTX-A was shown to have a greater effect than scopolamine.