scombroid poisoning


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Related to scombroid poisoning: Ciguatera poisoning, Paralytic shellfish poisoning

scom·broid poi·son·ing

poisoning from ingestion of heat-stable toxins produced by bacterial action on inadequately or improperly preserved dark-meat fish of the order Scombroidea (for example, tuna, bonito, mackerel, albacore, skipjack); characterized by epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, thirst, difficulty in swallowing, and urticaria.

scombroid poisoning

n.
Poisoning caused by ingesting fish containing scombrotoxin, especially scombroids such as tuna or mackerel. It is characterized by flushing, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, and hives. Also called scombrotoxin poisoning.

scombroid poisoning

toxic effects of eating scombroid fish (such as bonito or tuna) that have begun bacterial decomposition after being caught. Scombroid fish contain large amounts of free histidine in the muscle tissue, which gives rise to toxic levels of histamine under conditions of histidine decarboxylation by any of a dozen species of bacteria. Scombroid poisoning is not limited to consumption of fresh fish; the problem also may affect commercially canned tuna. Symptoms, which usually last no more than 24 hours, include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, epigastric pain, and urticaria.

scom·broid poi·son·ing

(skom'broyd poy'zŏn-ing)
Poisoning from ingestion of heat-stable toxins produced by bacterial action on inadequately preserved dark-meat fish of the order Scombroidea (tuna, bonito, mackerel, albacore, skipjack); characterized by epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, thirst, difficulty in swallowing, and urticaria.

scombroid poisoning

A condition believed to be caused by heat-stable toxin that develops in the muscles of red meat fish, such as tuna, that have been stored without adequate refrigeration. There is a bitter taste in the mouth, a wide-spread rash, a feeling of hotness, a fast pulse rate and sometimes diarrhoea and wheezing. These effects usually settle within 12 hours. Antihistamine drugs speed up recovery but the condition is not an allergy to fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
In April and May, 1992, there were at least 21 outbreaks of scombroid poisoning from fresh tuna involving a minimum of 79 illnesses in five states.
For example, a critical control point in the handling of tuna involves keeping the fish cold enough to prevent the formation of the histamines that cause scombroid poisoning.
Scombroid poisoning occurs when certain fish aren't kept cool enough.
For example, two diseases -- ciguatera and scombroid poisoning -- are responsible for four out of five confirmed seafood outbreaks numbering only about 150 illnesses per year.
This outbreak suggests interventions that could reduce the risk for scombroid poisoning.
You can also get scombroid poisoning from fresh tuna, swordfish, bluefish, and mahi mahi.
Scombroid poisoning is caused mainly by mahi-mahi, tuna, and blue-fish that haven't been refrigerated properly.