scombroid poisoning


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Related to scombroid poisoning: Ciguatera poisoning, Paralytic shellfish poisoning

scom·broid poi·son·ing

poisoning from ingestion of heat-stable toxins produced by bacterial action on inadequately or improperly preserved dark-meat fish of the order Scombroidea (for example, tuna, bonito, mackerel, albacore, skipjack); characterized by epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, thirst, difficulty in swallowing, and urticaria.

scombroid poisoning

n.
Poisoning caused by ingesting fish containing scombrotoxin, especially scombroids such as tuna or mackerel. It is characterized by flushing, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, and hives. Also called scombrotoxin poisoning.

scom·broid poi·son·ing

(skom'broyd poy'zŏn-ing)
Poisoning from ingestion of heat-stable toxins produced by bacterial action on inadequately preserved dark-meat fish of the order Scombroidea (tuna, bonito, mackerel, albacore, skipjack); characterized by epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, thirst, difficulty in swallowing, and urticaria.

scombroid poisoning

A condition believed to be caused by heat-stable toxin that develops in the muscles of red meat fish, such as tuna, that have been stored without adequate refrigeration. There is a bitter taste in the mouth, a wide-spread rash, a feeling of hotness, a fast pulse rate and sometimes diarrhoea and wheezing. These effects usually settle within 12 hours. Antihistamine drugs speed up recovery but the condition is not an allergy to fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
For scombroid poisoning or neurologic symptoms, DOHMH considered whether symptoms and onset were consistent with scombrotoxin, ciguatera toxin, or botulism poisoning.
[50.] Stratton JE and SL Taylor Scombroid poisoning. In: Ward DR and B Hackney (Eds.).
In restaurants, don't order tuna steak - another common source of scombroid poisoning - unless you are absolutely confident of its freshness.
Scombroid poisoning comes from histamine that can form on the flesh of fresh tuna, mahi mahi, and some other fish that aren't kept cold enough (usually before they reach the store).
According to a report before Warwick District Council's health and control committee next week, food safety chiefs traced the symptoms to scombroid poisoning, which is caused by the ingestion of foods containing high levels of histamine and other harmful bacteria.
It is to Vicki Peal, whose father died from Vibrio vulnificus eating raw oysters in 1992; Barbara Simpson, who lost her husband to scombroid poisoning from tuna; and the many others who have had friends or family die or become ill or have been sickened themselves from tainted fish.
After 3 years of study, their work demonstrated that the origin of scombroid poisoning was enzymatic and bacterial spoilage of the fish.