scolex


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

scolex

 [sko´leks] (Gr.)
the attachment organ (mouth) of a tapeworm, generally considered the anterior, or cephalic, end.

sco·lex

, pl.

sco·le·ces

,

scol·i·ces

(skō'leks, skō'le-sēz, skō'li-sēz),
The head or anterior end of a tapeworm attached by suckers, and frequently by rostellar hooks, to the wall of the intestine; it is formed within the hydatid cyst in Echinococcus, within a cysticercus in Taenia, a cysticercoid in Hymenolepis, or by a plerocercoid, as in Diphyllobothrium latum. The form of the scolex varies greatly, the most familiar being rounded or club-shaped with four circular muscular suckers and an armed or unarmed rostellum, or a spatulate flattened scolex with a pair of slitlike suckers (bothria) and no rostellum, as in Diphyllobothrium and its allies. Other forms have complex leaflike, cup-shaped, or fimbriated shapes, or retractile, multiply spined proboscides. These varied forms characterize the orders of cestodes, which are particularly well developed as parasites of sharks and skates or rays.
[G. skōlēx, a worm]

scolex

/sco·lex/ (sko´leks) pl. sco´leces, sco´lices   [Gr.] the attachment organ of a tapeworm, generally considered the anterior, or cephalic, end.

scolex

(skō′lĕks′)
n. pl. sco·lices (-lĭ-sēz′)
The knoblike anterior end of a tapeworm, having suckers or hooklike parts that in the adult stage serve as organs of attachment to the host on which the tapeworm is parasitic.

scolex

[skō′leks] pl. scoleces
Etymology: Gk, worm
the headlike segment or organ of an adult tapeworm that has hooks, grooves, or suckers by which it attaches itself to the wall of the intestine.

sco·lex

(skō'leks)
The head or anterior end of an adult tapeworm attached by suckers, and frequently by rostellar hooks, to the wall of the intestine.
[G. skōlēx, a worm]

scolex

The rounded head end of a tapeworm, bearing suckers or hooks by which it attaches itself to the intestine of the host.
Scolexclick for a larger image
Fig. 275 Scolex . The scolex of Taenia solium.

scolex

the ‘head’ of a tapeworm, being that part at the anterior end which bears hooks and suckers and is used for attachment to the gut wall of the host.

scolex

pl. scoleces [Gr.] the attachment organ of a tapeworm, generally considered the anterior, or cephalic, end.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is followed by the vesicular stage, marked by formation of a thin walled cyst that encircles the scolex containing antigennically inert clear fluid with no surrounding inflammatory response.
The scolex has four suckers and a conical, retractile rostellum "armed" with 1-8 rows of hooks, depending on the age of the parasite.
Histopathological reactions of the blue shark, Prionace glauca, to post larvae of Hepatoxylon trichiuri (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha: Fepatoxilidae) in relationship to scolex morphology.
Besides detection of the characteristic scolex in cysts, it is the combination of these findings that is most helpful in suggesting the diagnosis since there are few processes that are present with multiple cystic lesions and/or characteristic punctate calcifications.
Occasionally pathognomic features of cysticercosis lesion like scolex or sucking parts of the larva may be demonstrated (8).
Ultrasonography demonstrated a cystic lesion in the superficial lobe with eccentric hyperechoic foci suggestive of a scolex (the knoblike anterior end of a tapeworm, which has hook-like parts or suckers).
1) Cysticerci have a propensity for developing in the central nervous system (60% of cases) (4) and are classically described as containing an invaginated scolex (head of organism).
Demonstration of scolex within calcified cysticercus cyst: its possible role in the pathogenesis of perilesional edema.
This craspedate cestode has four suckers on an unarmed scolex.
In cysticercosis (Figure 16), calcifications are seen in the dead larva (granular-nodular stage) and the typical appearance is that of a small, calcified cyst containing an eccentric calcified nodule that represents the dead scolex.
The classical finding in active disease is a cystic lesion with a scolex (a small point in the center of the lesion), but other lesions also can be related to the disease, and these can be located anywhere in the brain.
A specialized attachment organ called the scolex is located at the cranial end and has hooks, suckers, or both.