sclerotic


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scle·rot·ic

(sklē-rot'ik),
1. Relating to or characterized by sclerosis.
2. Synonym(s): scleral
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sclerotic

(sklə-rŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Affected or marked by sclerosis.
2. Anatomy Of or relating to the sclera.
n.
See sclera.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

scle·rot·ic

(sklĕr-ot'ik)
1. Relating to or characterized by sclerosis.
2. Synonym(s): scleral.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sclerotic

1. The white outer coat (sclera) of the eye.
2. Pertaining to the SCLERA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

sclerotic

see SCLERA.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sclera 

The tough, white, opaque, fibrous outer tunic of the eyeball covering most of its surface (the cornea contributes 7% of, and completes, the outer tunic). Its anterior portion is visible and constitutes the 'white' of the eye. In childhood (or in pathological conditions) when the sclera is thin, it appears bluish, while in old age it may become yellowish, due to a deposition of fat. The sclera is thickest posteriorly (about 1 mm) and gradually becomes thinner towards the front of the eyeball. It is a sieve-like membrane at the lamina cribrosa. The sclera is pierced by three sets of apertures: (1) the posterior apertures round the optic nerve and through which pass the long and short posterior ciliary vessels and nerves; (2) the middle apertures, 4 mm behind the equator which give exit to the vortex veins; and (3) the anterior apertures through which pass the anterior ciliary vessels. The tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles run into the sclera as parallel fibres and then spread out in a fan-shaped manner. The sclera is commonly considered to be divided into three layers from without inward: (1) the episclera, (2) the scleral stroma and (3) the suprachoroid (lamina fusca) which is interposed between choroid and sclera. Syn. sclerotic. Note: some authors consider the suprachoroid as belonging to the choroid. However, when choroid and sclera are separated part of the suprachoroid adheres to the choroid and part to the sclera. See cribriform plate; evisceration.
blue sclera A hereditary defect in which the sclera has a bluish appearance. The sclera is thinner than normal and is susceptible to rupture if the person engages in contact sports. It is often associated with fragility of the bones and deafness as part of a condition called osteogenesis imperfecta (fragilitas ossium, van der Hoeve's syndrome), with keratoconus or with acquired scleral thinning (e. g. necrotizing scleritis). Syn. blue sclerotic (Fig. S3). See Ehlers-Danlos syndrome; Marfan's syndrome.
Fig. S3 Blue scleraenlarge picture
Fig. S3 Blue sclera
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 2: X-ray of both hands showing multiple small round or oval sclerotic spots of 2-10 mm in size.
Here we report an extremely rare case of pulmonary adenocarcinoma with sclerotic (osteoblastic) bone metastases.
The patient distribution across the AAGN classes was as follows: 34.5% (29/84) were focal, 26.2% (22/84) were crescentic, 19.0% (16/84) were sclerotic, and 20.2% (17/84) were mixed.
Furthermore, when cases with sclerotic histology were excluded from the analysis, survival without ESRD was basically similar in both ANCA subtypes (p = 0.34, Figure 1(c)).
In the present case, the right body of the mandible showed sclerotic change with prominent periosteal reaction on CT and showed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on STIR images, which were compatible with reported imaging findings.
Here, using data from the Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry (NKBR) and the Norwegian Renal Registry, we have analyzed predictive factors that could be used to stratify patients with ANCA-GN and a sclerotic histological picture based upon risk.
There was also presence of rounded, thick-walled, and dark brown pigmented sclerotic bodies.
The sclerotic hippocampus was further divided into subgroups, based on the atrophy of the end folium and the CA1 region [26].
The investigators reported that the procedures were more technically challenging due to the sclerotic nature of pagetic bone.
This lesion is characteristically a well-defined geographic lytic lesion with a sclerotic border, suggesting an indolent growth pattern (Figure 1).
A 74-year-old overweight Caucasian male referred to our clinic for sclerotic cutaneous involvement of the abdominopelvic region.