scleromalacia


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scleromalacia

 [skle″ro-mah-la´shah]
degeneration (softening) of the sclera, occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

scle·ro·ma·la·ci·a

(sklē'rō-mă-lā'shē-ă),
Degenerative thinning of the sclera, occurring in people with rheumatoid arthritis and other collagen disorders.
[sclero- + G. malakia, a softening]

scleromalacia

/scle·ro·ma·la·cia/ (sklēr″o-mah-la´shah) degeneration and thinning (softening) of the sclera, occurring in rheumatoid arthritis.

Paget disease of bone type 2

A disorder of bone remodelling (OMIM:602080) that involves the axial skeleton, with lesions of the spine, pelvis and skull.
 
Molecular pathology
Caused by defects in TNFRSF11A, which encodes a member of the TNF receptor that is essential for RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis.

scle·ro·ma·la·ci·a

(skler'ō-mă-lā'shē-ă)
Degenerative thinning of the sclera, occurring in people with rheumatoid arthritis and other collagen disorders.
[sclero- + G. malakia, a softening]

scleromalacia

Softening of the sclera usually as a complication of SCLERITIS complicating RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.

scleromalacia 

A bilateral and painless degenerative thinning of the sclera occurring in people with rheumatoid arthritis. In this condition rheumatoid nodules may develop in the sclera and cause perforation (scleromalacia perforans). Syn. necrotizing scleritis without inflammation; scleritis necroticans.

scleromalacia

degeneration (softening) of the sclera.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is usually very painful, with the exception of a necrotising form known as scleromalacia perforans, which is painless and occurs in patients with longstanding rheumatoid arthritis.
Scleromalacia perforans is a rare form of necrotising) anterior scleritis, commonly associated with chronic rheumatoid arthritis.
Pain is a typical feature, except in the rare cases of scleromalacia perforans, when the necrosis is painless.
There were no patients with posterior scleritis, necrotising scleritis or scleromalacia in this cohort.
Scleromalacia perforans: In patients with long-standing RA, the sclera becomes extremely thin and develops a blue-grey colour after the inflammation of repeated episodes of necrotising scleritis subsides.
Gilliland remembers seeing a 4-year-old boy with scleromalacia from a previous bout with meningococcemia.