scleromalacia


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scleromalacia

 [skle″ro-mah-la´shah]
degeneration (softening) of the sclera, occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

scle·ro·ma·la·ci·a

(sklē'rō-mă-lā'shē-ă),
Degenerative thinning of the sclera, occurring in people with rheumatoid arthritis and other collagen disorders.
[sclero- + G. malakia, a softening]

Paget disease of bone type 2

A disorder of bone remodelling (OMIM:602080) that involves the axial skeleton, with lesions of the spine, pelvis and skull.
 
Molecular pathology
Caused by defects in TNFRSF11A, which encodes a member of the TNF receptor that is essential for RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis.

scle·ro·ma·la·ci·a

(skler'ō-mă-lā'shē-ă)
Degenerative thinning of the sclera, occurring in people with rheumatoid arthritis and other collagen disorders.
[sclero- + G. malakia, a softening]

scleromalacia

Softening of the sclera usually as a complication of SCLERITIS complicating RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.

scleromalacia 

A bilateral and painless degenerative thinning of the sclera occurring in people with rheumatoid arthritis. In this condition rheumatoid nodules may develop in the sclera and cause perforation (scleromalacia perforans). Syn. necrotizing scleritis without inflammation; scleritis necroticans.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study shows that scleral thinning occurs in female patients with RA under active immunomodulatory treatment and no active scleritis, inflammatory vasculitis, or scleromalacia. This could be caused by a chronic inflammatory process, subclinical immune complex deposition, or direct destruction of scleral tissues by autoimmune reaction.
Scleromalacia perforans is a rare form of necrotising) anterior scleritis, commonly associated with chronic rheumatoid arthritis.
Pain is a typical feature, except in the rare cases of scleromalacia perforans, when the necrosis is painless.
There were no patients with posterior scleritis, necrotising scleritis or scleromalacia in this cohort.
In 1934, Van der Hoeve (NGUYEN & FOSTER, 1999) first recommended the use of grafts in scleromalacia perforans in human, using mucous membranes.
(3,4,5,6) Scleromalacia perforans and peripheral ulcerative keratopathy are other rare but frightening ocular complications.