scleritis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

scleritis

 [sklĕ-ri´tis]
inflammation of the sclera. It may be superficial (episcleritis) or deep.
anterior scleritis inflammation of the sclera adjoining the limbus of the cornea.
posterior scleritis scleritis involving the retina and choroid.

scle·ri·tis

(sklē-rī'tis),
Inflammation of the sclera.

scleritis

(sklə-rī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the sclera.

scle·rit′ic (-rĭt′ĭk) adj.

scleritis

Ophthalmology Inflammation of sclera, most common in older adults Etiology Idiopathic, or associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, metabolic disorders, infection, chemical or physical injury

scle·ri·tis

(skler-ī'tis)
Inflammation of the sclera.

scleritis

Inflammation of the SCLERA, usually as a feature of a general disease such as rheumatoid arthritis or as a complication of ophthalmic shingles (herpes zoster) or Wegener's granulomatosis. Treatment is with corticosteroid drugs often in the form of eyedrops.

scleritis 

Inflammation of the sclera, which in its severe necrotizing or in the posterior type may cause sight-threatening complications such as keratitis, uveitis, angle-closure glaucoma or optic neuropathy. It affects females more commonly than males in the fourth to sixth decades of life. Like episcleritis it has a tendency to recur. It is characterized by pain, which can be severe, redness, tearing and some patients may develop nodules (nodular scleritis). It is often associated with a systemic disease (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, polyarteritis nodosa, lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, syphilis, herpes zoster). It can involve part of the sclera, e.g. anterior scleritis (which is the most common, and it is classified as diffuse non-necrotizing or nodular non-necrotizing) or posterior scleritis. Treatment includes topical and systemic steroids and immunosuppressive drugs for very severe cases. See acute stromal keratitis; Brown's superior oblique tendon sheath syndrome.
necrotizing scleritis The most severe form of scleritis, much less common than the other types. About half the patients have one of the following diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, polyarteritis nodosa, systemic lupus erythematosus, or herpes zoster. It is characterized by pain, and white, avascular areas next to damaged areas through which one can see the brown colour of the underlying uveal tissue, and to congested areas of the sclera. In most cases visual acuity is decreased. The necrosis gradually spreads around the globe. Treatment typically consists of topical steroids, immunosuppressive agents and occasionally surgery to repair scleral or corneal perforation. See keratolysis; scleromalacia.
scleritis necroticans See scleromalacia.
posterior scleritis Inflammation of the sclera involving the posterior segment of the eye. The condition is often associated with a systemic disease (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis). It is characterized by pain and reduced visual acuity. The severity of the visual impairment depends on the involved tissue and its location. Signs include eyelid oedema, proptosis, limitation of ocular movements and, if anterior scleritis is present, redness. The ocular fundus may present disc swelling, choroidal folds, macular oedema and serous retinal detachment. Treatment consists mainly of systemic steroids and immunosuppressive agents. See choroidal folds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among all the patients with dry eyes, 24 (60%) were found to have positive rheumatoid factor and all the keratitis, scleritis, and episcleritis patients were seropositive.
This patient initially presented with refractory scleritis and inflammatory arthritis.
Ozturk, "Scleritis and sudden hearing loss associated with familial Mediterranean fever," Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, vol.
(1) Other well-known ocular complications are scleritis, episcleritis, keratitis, peripheral corneal ulceration, and anterior uveitis.
Moderate to high-dose GCs, possibly combined with other immunosuppressant drugs, are used in severe extra-articular disease including serositis, vasculitis and scleritis.
One hundred and nine young patients with clinical features and laboratory findings (acute onset with hyperthermia more 38.5[degrees]C, scleritis, intoxication syndrome, etc., positive epidemiologic data) were investigated during October-March 2011-2012 at the Dept.
XOMA said that in November 2011 it launched a similar POC clinical programme, which included studies in three separate indications: moderate to severe inflammatory acne vulgaris, erosive inflammatory osteoarthritis of the hand, and non-anterior scleritis. SERVIER has selected several indications across multiple therapeutic areas.
Extra articular features include anaemia (not related to iron deficiency anaemia) fatigue, neuropathy, vasculitis, scleritis. Renal involvement is not common in RA but it is common in SLE.
Ophthalmologists and a rheumatologist discuss the current understanding of scleritis, an inflammatory disease of the outer coat of the eye.
If extrauveal inflammation such as scleritis occurs, the strategy in the search of associated disease should focus on SLE.
Other spondyloarthropathies exhibit extra-articular manifestations, such as ocular inflammation (conjunctivitis, iritis, scleritis and episcleritis), oral ulcerations and urethritis.