sclerema


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Related to sclerema: Scleroderma, scleroderma neonatorum

sclerema

 [sklĕ-re´mah]
induration of the subcutaneous fat.
sclerema adipo´sum (sclerema neonato´rum) diffuse, waxlike hardening of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that occurs in premature and debilitated infants during the first weeks of life, usually associated with an underlying condition such as sepsis, congenital heart disease, respiratory distress, or severe dehydration. As it progresses, the skin becomes cold, mottled, yellow to white, and stony hard. The prognosis is poor if it becomes generalized. Called also edema neonatorum.

scle·re·ma

(sklĕ-rē'mă), Do not confuse this word with scleredema or scleroderma.
Induration of subcutaneous fat.
[scler- + edema]

scle·re·ma

(skler-ē'mă)
Induration of subcutaneous fat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sclerema neonatorum and subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn in the same infant.
In the view of progressing sclerema and hypoglycemic episodes, complete blood count along with blood culture and CRP were resent and antibiotics upgraded to second line (vancomycin plus piperacillin tazobactam) as per our NICU protocol.
We performed a literature search regarding the possible management of worsening sepsis with sclerema neonatorum.
Sclerema neonatorum (SN) is a rare skin condition, the major manifestation of which is generalized hardening of skin and subcutaneous tissue of infants [1].
reported 25 preterm neonates with sclerema neonatorum of which 11 neonates (group A) were treated with steroids while 14 neonates (group B) were treated with antibiotics and supportive therapy without steroids.
The day of appearance of Miliaria crystalline, Bullous impetigo, Oral candidiasis, Breast abscess and Sclerema neonatorum was similar to earlier studies (Smith 1965, Hodgman 1971, Rudoy 1975, Atherton 1992, Wagner 1995).
Amongst the skin lesions which required treatment, only baby with sclerema neonatorum was treated in NICU.
1 Miliaria crystallina 353 95.3 2 Scalp ecchymosis 71 7.1 3 Perianal dermatitis 56 5.6 4 Miliaria rubra 24 2.4 5 Caput succedaneum 9 0.9 6 Sclerema neonatorum 1 0.1 Table XIII.
Involvement of trunk, buttocks and thighs together with rapid evolution after birth is typical of incontinentia pigmenti6 and sclerema neonatorum.7 However, interface dermatitis in histology is inconsistent with both the diseases.
They were compared with age-matched controls, who were critically ill (Sclerema) but did not undergo exchange transfusion.
RESULTS: Thirty neonates who underwent exchange transfusion for severe sepsis (sclerema) were included in the study and compared with 30 babies with severe sepsis (sclerema) who did not received exchange transfusion.
A comparative study on the value of exchange transfusion in the management of severe neonatal septicemia with sclerema. Indian J Pediatr 1982; 49(399):519-23.