scleral icterus

scleral icterus

Physical exam Yellowing of the sclera, typical of liver disease, especially hepatitis. See Jaundice.
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The physical examination revealed jaundice, scleral icterus, purpuric macules, superficial desquamation, gingivitis (FIGURE 1), and perifollicular hemorrhages with corkscrew hairs (FIGURES 2 AND 3).
Physical examination revealed scleral icterus and mild epigastric area tenderness only.
Physical exam was remarkable for scleral icterus and mild jaundice; no xanthomas were noted.
Physical examination is notable for scleral icterus, jaundice, tender hepatomegaly, and asterixis.
Initial physical examination of the patient revealed mild scleral icterus, rhabdomyolysis, and rash on his thighs.
Scleral icterus and mild erythema of the right upper eyelid were observed.
He had scleral icterus, had no pharyngeal erythema or tender lymphadenopathy, no hepatosplenomegaly and no abdominal tenderness.
Physical examination by the primary-care physician revealed mild scleral icterus and upper abdominal tenderness.
5 times the upper limit of normal (>100 IU/1), with jaundice and/or scleral icterus and three or more of the following symptoms: dark-colored urine; light-colored stools; fever; nausea; vomiting; anorexia; aversion to smoking; pruritus; right upper abdominal discomfort, pain or feeling of pressure; and pruritic red hives of less than four weeks.
Bedsides examination, disclosed a regular pulse of 76/min, blood pressure 126/76 mm Hg, conjuctival pallor, scleral icterus (Fig.
A 71-year-old man presented to his primary care physician's office with scleral icterus, right-upper-quadrant abdominal pain, anorexia, and a 22-pound weight loss during 4 to 6 weeks.