scientism


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scientism

(sī′ən-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. The collection of attitudes and practices considered typical of scientists.
2. The belief that the investigative methods of the physical sciences are applicable or justifiable in all fields of inquiry.

sci′en·tis′tic adj.

scientism

(1) The belief that the methods used in the investigation of phenomena in the physical universe can be applied to all areas of research, including the cognitive sciences.  
(2) The use of scientific methods and principles for inappropriate topics.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I argue that the sidelining of theology and philosophy from the debate is actually an example of the influence of scientism, defined as the belief that science is the only way to gain reliable knowledge about the world" (p.
I would invite the author to practice for himself his recommendation of being a critical thinker, and think a little bit about the limits and flaws of scientism.
Despite its apparent defeat, scientism still reigns.
The high achievements of physical and biological science in the nineteenth century gave powerful reinforcement to the advocates of 'scientism' in sociology and politics.
From this perspective, everything that happens in the universe does so according to strictly defined scientific laws, and the same laws that govern the workings of protons also govern the biochemical processes that explain fish in the sea as well as experiences in the "mind" and "heart." Matter is self-ordering and contingent and so need not rely on anything other than the laws of nature that scientism has laid down.
One is a heritage of scientism. From the second half of 19th century, Chinese anxieties about backwardness have promoted a faith in science.
The book discusses science and scientism, and belief and knowledge.
Maybe if we had gotten a grant we could have paid for scientism studies to prove its effectiveness and then with the help of a marketing consultant rebranded it as "Jeannefulness."
For decades, philosophy in English-speaking countries has been dominated by various forms of scientism such as linguistic analysis and logical positivism.
Hegel, Rousseau, Comte, and of course Karl Marx did a great deal of pen-wielding to arrest this development and one of their most potent weapons has been to link the ideals of a fully free society to the flaws of scientism and one of its products, subjective or narrow individualism.
Responding to their critics, patrons "embraced a strategy that rested on two key commitments, to scientism and to social engineering" (4).
In her address, entitled Science, Scientism and the Self, Mary said the physical sciences are a source of knowledge but help little in understanding things that puzzle us in life such as warfare or ethics.
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