scientific theory


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Related to scientific theory: scientific method

scientific theory

a theory that can be tested and potentially disproved; failure to disprove or refute it increases confidence in it, but it cannot be considered as proven.

sci·en·tif·ic the·o·ry

(sī'ĕn-tif'ik thē'ŏr-ē)
A proposition that can be tested and potentially disproved; failure to disprove or refute it increases confidence in it, but it cannot be considered as proven.
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References in periodicals archive ?
6) The intuitive process that leads to a scientific theory.
A scientific theory is always open to falsification, if new evidence is presented.
A scientific theory is a proposed explanation of some natural occurrence that has survived rigorous scientific testing without being refuted.
Whether evolution itself is a good or bad scientific theory may be argued, but the evidence in its favor is overwhelming.
The institute's Center for Science and Culture says that it "encourages schools to improve science education by teaching students more fully about the theory of evolution, as well as supporting the work of scholars who challenge various aspects of neo-Darwinian theory and scholars who are working on the scientific theory known as intelligent design.
Harman suggests that Levine's popular press books are reader-friendly versions of a much more substantial scientific theory.
What's the difference between a scientific theory that can be tested and something that cannot be tested?
In parts of the book, Heller argues that while scientific theory and praxes are applicable in all fields of inquiry about the world (e.
The American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia sued the Cobb County School District in northwest Georgia on behalf of five parents who argued that the stickers promoted religious views over scientific theory.
Examining how feminism contributed to the privatization of Christianity, the power of evangelicalism, flaws in modern scientific theory, and more.
But it nonetheless allowed creationists to position themselves as believers in an alternative scientific theory rather than mere religious dogma.
Using Michel Foucault and Elaine Scarry, among others, as theoretical frames, the introduction most importantly discusses the emerging scientific theory of polygenesis, which replaced the earlier theory of monogenesis by assuming innate differences between races (and genders) rather than posing a common origin for different races.

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