school

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school

(skūl),
A set of beliefs, teachings, methods, etc.
[O. E. scōl]

school

a group of fish or marine mammals that remain together in a coordinated fashion.

Patient discussion about school

Q. What is the best school for nurses in California?

A. i found a site that rank nursing schools in the U.S. , looks reliable, check it out:
http://www.nursingschools.com/articles/ranking.html

Q. How can I get my son into a normal school? He was diagnosed as autistic but he is intelligent and is able to go through normal education. But I don’t want him to be socially disconnected…

A. If done in a proper way it can be an excellent idea! Your son will flourish and will develop as best as he can. But if just moving him to a regular school without any preparation to him, class and teacher- that can end up very bad. So talk to the teacher the headmaster and councilor explain and work up a plan. Then it must be explained to the class. and don’t forget your son…he needs to understand that he might get unpleasant reactions sometimes.

Q. I don’t know how to make him responsive at least when it comes to studies in school or at home? My child is diagnosed with ADHD. He was very inattentive in his class and we do get regular complaints from the school. At home he watches cartoons that he loves and refuses to have his dinner even. He cannot sit for more than ten minutes to complete his home work. Even very minor sound distracts him from doing his homework. He has trouble paying attention to the activities he does not like. I don’t know how to make him responsive at least when it comes to studies in school or at home.

A. it takes alot of time and patience and loving. without them none of itwill never work. both from teachers and parents and friends and family.

More discussions about school
References in periodicals archive ?
An article called "Let the Facts Speak," by the HSLDA, further elaborates on this fallacy: some states consider home schools to be "private schools"; therefore, those states' colleges would bunch home-schooled applicants in with "privately schooled applicants."
Catholic industrialists and other employers influenced that trend by informing workers that continued employment might depend upon where and by whom their children were schooled. To produce a literate work force that was also respectful of authority, secular patrons and congregations cooperated to make many schools tuition-free or low in cost.
Says one researcher, "The conventionally schooled tended to be considerably more aggressive, loud, and competitive than the home educated."