school readiness


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school readiness

An educational milestone in the development of a child, experienced when he or she is independent and mature enough to listen, work, and play in a structured learning environment.
See also: readiness
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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He also said school readiness enabled an accurate processing of sensory stimulation in the environment as well as in one's own body that influences attention and learning that affects how a child sits, holds a pencil and listens to the teacher.
The second chapter of School Readiness and the Characteristics of Effective Learning explores how starting school can be compared to a lottery, or a game of chance in terms of school readiness.
The SADoBE introduced the kindergarten or Grade R year in an attempt to improve school readiness and to eliminate possible deficits (Chisholm, 2005).
"Given the importance of phonological awareness and how it contributes to school readiness, using digital resources in a highly controlled setting, like a classroom, may substantially help to close the 'app gap,'" concludes Neuman.
Framing school readiness in this way has led many to question what it is children should know, do, and learn in such public preschool programs as pre-kindergarten (pre-K) and Head Start (Miles & Stipek, 2006; Neuman & Roskos, 2005).
School readiness interventions that have demonstrated impacts into adolescence and adulthood are typically intensive and long term (i.e., 1 year or more), leading some researchers to assert that longer-term interventions might be required to prevent behavioral and academic problems (Greenberg, Domitrovich, & Bumbarger, 2001).
ELR is a free program, open to the community supporting school readiness for preschool age children and their caregivers.
Promoting school readiness and early learning; implications of developmental research for practice.
The study examined (1) the impact of the school-readiness music program on children's acquisition of social skills as reported by teachers and parents and (2) the impact of the program on teacher reporting of school readiness that include measures assessing language, learning, and self-help skills.
The theory is based on several years of studies matching stress hormone levels to behavioral and school readiness test results in young children from impoverished backgrounds.
The study's authors gauged school readiness using results from the South Carolina Readiness Assessment conducted by kindergarten teachers throughout the state.

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