school phobia


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Related to school phobia: School refusal

school pho·bi·a

a young child's sudden aversion to or fear of attending school, usually considered a manifestation of separation anxiety.

school phobia

Etymology: AS, scol + Gk, phobos, fear
an extreme separation anxiety disorder of children, usually in the elementary grades, characterized by a persistent irrational fear of going to school or being in a school-like atmosphere. Such children are usually oversensitive, shy, timid, nervous, and emotionally immature and have pervasive feelings of inadequacy. They typically try to cope with their fears by becoming overdependent on others, especially the parents.
Fear of going to school associated with anxiety about leaving home and family

school phobia

Child psychology Fear of going to school associated with anxiety about leaving home and family members

school pho·bi·a

(skūl fō'bē-ă)
A young child's sudden aversion to or fear of attending school, usually considered a manifestation of separation anxiety.
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References in periodicals archive ?
45 has to However, psychologists point out that stress at home, such as parental separation, may be the underlying cause of school phobia.
Professor Julian Elliott, an educational psychologist Schools overcome at Durham University, says that while parents often don't know their child is truanting, they're usually aware if he/she has school phobia.
Baker, The Management of School Phobia, (Florence, KY: Taylor and Frances/Routledge, 1990).
For other children, school phobia shows itself as a more obvious psychological problem.
School phobia with separation anxiety disorder: A comparative 20- to 29-year follow-up study of 35 school refusers.
The revision will pave the way for graduates of Korean and other foreign schools in Japan and Japanese who never finished junior high school due to sickness or school phobia to attend national universities from April, 2001 if they pass the "daiken" exam.
Or they may be picked on by classmates, develop school phobia, or engage in truancy.
Berg, Nicholas and Pritchard (1969) described school phobia as:
It is one of the most common causes of prolonged school absence, and it is time to put to rest the notion that this represents either school phobia or school refusal.
In addition, Prof Reid was the only non-USA citizen to be invited to be part of reviews on persistent school absenteeism and school phobia for the Obama administration.

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