schizotypal personality disorder

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Related to schizotypal personality: schizoid personality

schizotypal personality disorder

 
a personality disorder characterized by a pattern of social and interpersonal deficits with eccentricities of behavior, thought, and speech. People with schizotypal personalities may exhibit magical thinking, for example, claiming that they are clairvoyant or telepathic, may have recurrent illusions, or may exhibit derealization. Their speech is marked by vagueness, metaphors, odd usages of words, and other features that can make it difficult to understand. Persons with this disorder often are aloof and socially isolated with little capability or desire for close relationships, excessive social anxiety, suspiciousness, and disturbed affect. Although the disorder is related to schizophrenia, it differs in that any periods of psychosis are only transient.

schizotypal personality disorder

1. an enduring and pervasive pattern of behavior in adulthood characterized by discomfort with and reduced capacity for close relationships, cognitive or perceptual distortions, and eccentric behavior.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

schizotypal personality disorder

(skĭt′sə-tī′pəl)
n.
A personality disorder characterized by severe discomfort with close relationships in addition to odd or inappropriate beliefs, behaviors, and speech, but without delusions or other symptoms characteristic of schizophrenia.

schizotypal personality disorder

[skit′sōtī′pəl]
Etymology: Gk, schizein + typos, mark; L, personalis, of a person, dis, opposite of, ordo, rank
a DSM-IV psychiatric disorder characterized by oddities of thought, perception, speech, and behavior that are not severe enough to meet the clinical criteria for schizophrenia. Symptoms may include magical thinking inconsistent with cultural norms, such as superstitiousness, belief in clairvoyance and telepathy, and bizarre fantasies; ideas of reference; recurrent illusions, such as sensing the presence of a force or person not actually present; social isolation; peculiar speech patterns, including ideas expressed unclearly or words used deviantly; and exaggerated anxiety or hypersensitivity to real or imagined criticism. See also schizoid personality disorder, schizophrenia.

schizotypal personality disorder

301.22 DSM-IV Psychiatry A schizophrenia-like condition characterized by defects in interpersonal relationships and disturbed thought patterns, appearance, behavior; Pts with SPD have bizarre speech, poor social skills, strained relationships with others; it is more common in relatives of schizophrenic. See Schizophrenia.

schiz·o·typ·al per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(skiz'ō-tīp'ăl pĕr-sŏn-al'i-tē dis-ōr'dĕr)
An enduring and pervasive pattern of behavior in adulthood characterized by discomfort with and reduced capacity for close relationships, cognitive or perceptual distortions, and eccentric behavior. People with such a disorder hold ideas that are considered unusual, and have difficulty relating to others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Experience of pleasure and emotional expression in individuals with schizotypal personality features.
The re-emergence of a dysfunction of the minimal self as the essential core of benign schizotypy, schizotypal personality disorder and schizophrenia has invigorated the study of these conditions.
The reliability and validity of schizotypal personality questionnaire (SPQ) in Turkish students.
The schizophrenia spectrum is a dimensional model of psychopathology that includes schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorder.
The second measure was the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ; Raine, 1991).
2003) found that 48% of participants in their study with schizotypal personality characteristics were diagnosed as having schizophrenia within a year.
All participants completed four self-report instruments to assess their adult attachment style, attachment style to God, emotional stability and neuroticism, and schizotypal personality dimensions (cognitive-perceptual, interpersonal, and/or disorganization).
Type I, which could be called 'disorganised and emotionally unstable', is characterised by schizotypal personality traits, high degrees of impulsiveness, alcohol and substance abuse, psychopathological alterations and early onset age.
The highest baseline rates of alcohol dependence were among individuals with schizotypal personality disorder, dependent personality disorder, or borderline personality disorder, Dr.