scavenger cell

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phag·o·cyte

(fag'ō-sīt),
A cell that can ingest bacteria, foreign particles, and other cells. Phagocytes ingest and kill microbes, present antigen to lymphocytes, scavenge degenerating material, and release mediators. classes: 1) microphages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes that ingest chiefly bacteria; 2) macrophages, mononucleated cells (histiocytes and monocytes) that are largely scavengers, ingesting dead tissue and degenerated cells.
[phago- + G. kytos, cell]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

scavenger cell

A nonspecific term for a phagocytic cell; macrophage.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It undergoes constant renewal, like other tissue components, and is taken up by scavenger cells and other cells in the neighborhood.
Plaques begin with a buildup of greasy lipid molecules such as cholesterol, and this accumulation attracts scavenger cells from the immune system called macrophages.
The tailings from both column cells discharge into a box which distributes the pulp to two lines of scavenger cells.
Hajjar's studies suggest that once inside the artery wall, the monocytes turn into scavenger cells that gobble up cholesterol and other fats.
Each of the two circuits has five rougher, two cleaner and four scavenger cells.
As a result, the fatty material builds up in scavenger cells of the immune systems, called macrophages.
Instead, scientists have accumulated evidence that HIV in the central nervous system mainly replicates inside two types of related cells: macrophages (scavenger cells that have migrated from the blood) and microglial cells (the resident immune cells of the brain and spinal cord).
But he suggests that immune-system scavenger cells in the brain may directly contribute to the Alzheimer's scenario by over-producing beta amyloid themselves.
Such soluble substances could be primarily responsible for demyelination, according to McFarlin, who predicts that "in the next few years, a number of these factors will be shown to have direct effects on myelin.' The latest results supporting this optimism are new data indicating that scavenger cells called macrophages secrete a chemical that disintegrates other cells and McFarlin's preliminary discovery that multiple sclerosis patients have a "peculiar pattern of T-cell receptor gene.' It is also possible, says McFarlin, that several genes responsible for regulation of the immune system are defective in multiple sclerosis.
The chief victims: mononuclear cells, the scavenger cells that destroy bacteria and other foreign material.
Secondary rougher and rougher scavenger cell concentrate when required passes to 254 mm diameter regrind hydrocyclones.