scattered radiation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

scat·tered ra·di·a·tion

secondary radiation emitted from the interaction of x-rays with matter; generally lower in energy, with a directional distribution that depends on the energy of the incident radiation.
Synonym(s): secondary radiation

scattered radiation

[skat′ərd]
Etymology: ME, scateren, to throw away; L, radiare, to emit rays
photons that move in a different direction than the incident photons that produced them, after the interaction of those incident photons. Also called backscatter radiation.

scat·tered ra·di·a·tion

(skat'ĕrd rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Radiation that has been deflected from its path by impact with matter. This form of secondary radiation is emitted diffusely by the tissues of the patient during exposure to x-radiation.
See also: secondary radiation

scat·tered ra·di·a·tion

(skat'ĕrd rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Radiation that has been deflected from its path by impact with matter. This form of secondary radiation is emitted diffusely by the tissues of the patient during exposure to x-radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
1] *510(k) pending for all anatomies where scattered radiation may have an impact on image quality; usage for chest radiographs cleared (K140771) on April 25, 2014.
when crystalline regions predominates in front of amorphous regions, scattered radiation intensity increases with the increasing crystallinity, quite the reverse than for crystallinity values lesser than that percentage.
The precisely aimed, low-dose radiation beam produces no scattered radiation, making the system secure and easy to operate.
It was discovered that some scattered radiation from the cylindrical aluminum source container was being measured by the FAC and that a correction of 0.
The system features two selectable Tantalum (Ta) filters, which are more effective at reducing radiation dose to the patient by eliminating low-energy X-rays, while also cutting high-energy X-rays to suppress scattered radiation.
The purchase of quality fluoroscopic imaging equipment to provide greater customization and more effective dose management, and the positioning of additional shielding equipment and fixed barriers to provide protection from scattered radiation
In conventional image-intensifier-based systems, scattered radiation from the patient causes a background fog in the image which reduces clarity and increases the radiation required to observe small features in an image.