scat

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sheep cell agglutination test

 (SCAT)
a laboratory test for infectious mononucleosis. When the antibody level of a person with this disease reaches a certain level, a sample of his blood will cause agglutination of sheep erythrocytes. If there is agglutination of these cells in concentrations up to 1:28, the findings are considered positive for infectious mononucleosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

scat

(skăt)
n.
Excrement, especially of an animal; dung.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Abbreviation for:
Simvastatin And Enalapril Coronary Atherosclerosis Trial
Scatula—Pharmacology
Severe Combined Anaemia & Thrombocytopenia
Sheep Cell Agglutination Test
Sickle Cell Anaemia Test
Drug slang A regional street term for heroin
Performing arts medicine A style of singing with wordless vocables and nonsense syllables, improvised melodies and rhythms, creating the equivalent of an instrumental solo with the voice Example Ella Fitzgerald, ‘How High the Moon’
Sexology Vernacular term for coprophilia
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several poets from Langston Hughes to Amiri Baraka have made use of scat singing by placing runs of nonsensical syllables at crucial junctures within the text when language seems to collapse.
Benson is without doubt at his best when exploring his jazz history and mercifully he took a break from his cheesy ballads to indulge in some acapella scat singing. The audience went mad and one enamoured lady gushed: "All the way, George." And it truly was a moment that lifted you out of easy listening hell and gave you goose bumps.
Who is credited with the invention of scat singing?
An archaic meaning of "extravagant" is "wandering beyond bounds," which certainly applies to Armstrong's genius--it was so far-reaching, new categories had to be invented just to keep up with it: On the 1925 "Heebie Jeebies" he invented scat singing; he made glissandos on "Cornet Chop Suey" never heard before; he is responsible for much of jazz lingo--"swing," "cats," "chops." Bing Crosby was most succinct (and correct) when he said that Satchmo is "the beginning and the end of music in America." Miles Davis said, "You know you can't play anything on the horn that Louis hasn't already played--I mean even modern." No jazz singer or instrumentalist is untouched by him, and none will ever go beyond him.
Go to YouTube, and you'll find clips of him singing everything from Bach cantatas and Mozart opera - he's wonderful as Papageno in "The Magic Flute" - to a Paul Robeson-inspired "Old Man River," a nightclub version of "Moon River" and even improvised scat singing with Bobby McFerrin (who's also going to be at the 40th anniversary bash here in Eugene).
The shuffling beats, the laidback scat singing and gutsy holler, the chewy blues riffs, the "tapping" of strings all struck a chord with anyone who had stumbled across his shows in the South-west and the low-key release sold out its 3,000 copies.
In Paris, during the '60s, he was a founding member of the fabled Double Six of Paris, then took the scat singing idea and applied it to the works of Bach, hence The Swingle Singers, whose early recordings won five Grammies.
It covers all the bases - a strong song made famous by Billie Holiday (though it was Sarah Vaughan's version that inspired Jacqui), a fine arrangement that begins with double bass and drums behind the rock-pulsed vocal, a bluesy guitar solo, a piano entry after verse two, with some multi-tracked scat singing, all helping to build and develop the mood which combines hope and trepidation.
She does not go in for excesses of scat singing nor extremes of abstract vocal improvisation, rarely straying far from the tune, but she improvises judiciously and brings songs alive with her fine, velvety voice and rhythmic awareness.
The effect is a kind of liminal semi-sense, more referential to the real world than, say, scat singing but still a bit hazy, as though one were being addressed in Turkish in one's dreams.