scapula

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scapula

 [skap´u-lah] (L.)
the flat triangular bone in the back of the shoulder. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.
winged scapula one having a prominent vertebral border usually owing to weakness of one of the muscles holding the scapula in place.

scap·u·la

, gen. and pl.

scap·u·lae

(skap'yū-lă, -lē), [TA]
A large triangular flattened bone lying over the ribs, posteriorly on either side, articulating laterally with the clavicle at the acromioclavicular joint and the humerus at the glenohumeral joint. It forms a functional articulation with the chest wall, the scapulothoracic articulation.
[L. scapulae, the shoulder blades]

scapula

(skăp′yə-lə)
n. pl. scapu·las or scapu·lae (-lē′)
Either of two large, flat, triangular bones forming the back part of the shoulder. Also called shoulder blade.

scap·u·la

, pl. scapulae (skap'yū-lă, -lē) [TA]
A large, triangular, flattened bone lying over the ribs, posteriorly on either side, articulating laterally with the clavicle at the acromioclavicular joint and the humerus at the glenohumeral joint. It forms a functional joint with the chest wall, the scapulothoracic joint.
Synonym(s): shoulder blade.
[L. scapulae, the shoulder blades]

scapula

(skapu-la') [L., shoulder blade]
Enlarge picture
SCAPULA
The large, flat, triangular bone that forms the posterior part of the shoulder. It articulates with the clavicle and the humerus. Synonym: shoulder blade See: illustration; triceps

plane of scapula

The angle of the scapula in its resting position, normally 30° to 45° forward from the frontal plane toward the sagittal plane. Movement of the humerus in this plane is less restricted than in the frontal or sagittal planes because the capsule is not twisted.
See: Scapula Instability

tipped scapula

A condition in which the inferior angle of the scapula is prominent, usually the result of faulty posture and a tight pectoralis minor muscle. Tipping is a normal motion when a person reaches with the hand behind the back.

winged scapula

Condition in which the medial border of the scapula is prominent, usually the result of paralysis of the serratus anterior or trapezius muscles. Synonym: angel's wing

scapula

The shoulder blade. A flat, triangular bone with a prominent, near-horizontal raised spine, lying over the upper ribs of the back. At its upper and outer angle the scapula bears a shallow hollow with which the rounded head of the upper arm bone (the humerus) articulates. The spine ends in a bony process, the coracoid process, the end of which connects with the outer end of the collar bone (clavicle).

scapula

the shoulder blade. see PECTORAL GIRDLE.

scap·u·la

, pl. scapulae (skap'yū-lă, -lē) [TA]
Large triangular flattened bone lying over the ribs, posteriorly on either side, articulating laterally with clavicle at the acromioclavicular joint and humerus at the glenohumeral joint.
[L. scapulae, the shoulder blades]
References in periodicals archive ?
Morphometric measurements of the scapula. SNW, suprascapular notch width; SND, suprascapular notch depth; TS-SN, distance between the supraglenoid tubercle and deepest point of the suprascapular notch AL; acromion length; A-CP, distance between the acromion and coracoid process; USA, upper scapular angle; LSA; lower scapular angle.
During the evolution of the upper extremity, the scapula more than any other bone of the shoulder girdle reflects momentous alterations that have been brought about by increased functional demands of a prehensile limb.
The high prevalence of impingement syndrome in modern humans may be partly related to the shape acquired by the scapula throughout evolution.
[14] Mansur et al had reported that the mean length of acromion process of right scapula was 4.64 cm and that of left side was 4.55 cm.
Study of variations in the shape of the suprascapular notch in Dried Human Scapula. Int J Biol Med Res.
Anatomical variations in sha-pe of suprascapular notch of scapula. J.
[25] These distances are 1.4 cm from posterior border of glenoid just at the base of spine of scapula & 2.3 cm from glenoid just at the upper rim of glenoid.
Wang HJ [28] explained a scapula with double suprascapular foramen in Chinese population.
Familial calcification of the superior transverse scapula ligament causing neuropathy.
The incidence was more prevalent on left side scapula (10.71%) as compared to right side scapula (8.93%) [Table-1].
DISCUSSION: The suprascapular notch is usually present in every scapula. Several morphological variations and classifications of suprascapular notch have been reported in various populations.
(5,6,8) Suprascapular nerve originates from the lateral aspect of superior trunk of the brachial plexus with contribution from the 5th and 6th anterior cervical roots, occasionally from 4th root as well and travels downward reach to the upper border of the scapula and enters the supraspinatus fossa through the suprascapular notch below the STS[L.sup.*](suprascapular vessels above the STS[L.sup.*]).