scapular abduction

scap·u·lar ab·duc·tion

(skap'yū-lăr ab-dŭk'shŭn)
Forward movement of the scapula.
References in periodicals archive ?
The difference in results between this study and ours may be attributed to the difference in the strength measurement techniques (isokinetic versus isometric), the planes of the shoulder strengths measured (flexion versus scapular abduction), and the extent of core muscle activations (abdominals versus abdominals and gluteals).
Repair of the subscapularis with rTSA significantly increased the force required by the posterior deltoid, total deltoid, infraspinatus, teres minor, total posterior cuff, and pectoralis major muscles and also significantly increased the meanjoint reaction force during scapular abduction with the elbow flexed to 90[degrees] relative to when the subscapularis was not repaired (Table 1).
Caption: Figure 2 Comparison of deltoid force requirements during scapular abduction with the elbow flexed to 90[degrees].
Caption: Figure 3 Comparison of posterior rotator cuff force requirements during scapular abduction with the elbow flexed to 90[degrees].
Caption: Figure 4 Comparison of joint reaction force requirements during scapular abduction with the elbow flexed to 90[degrees].
(6-14) In this study, we quantified the abductor moment arms of the anterior, middle, and posterior heads of the deltoid during scapular abduction for the normal anatomic shoulder, the 36 mm Grammont Delta III (Depuy, Inc.), 36 mm Grammont BIO-RSA[R] (Tornier, Inc.), the 32 mm RSP[R] (DJO, Inc.), and the Equinoxe[R] rTSA (Exactech, Inc.) with three different glenosphere geometries: 38 mm x 21 mm, 46 mm x 25 mm, and the aforementioned novel 46 mm x 21 mm.
The abductor moment arms for the anterior, middle, and posterior heads of the deltoid for each glenosphere geometry and the normal anatomic shoulder during scapular abduction from 0[degrees] to 140[degrees] are presented in Figures 3, 4, and 5, respectively.
Caption: Figure 3 Comparison of anterior deltoid moment arms during scapular abduction from 0[degrees] to 140[degrees].
Caption: Figure 4 Comparison of middle deltoid moment arms during scapular abduction from 0[degrees] to 140[degrees].
Table 3 presents the deltoid wrapping of each prosthesis design when the arm is at the side and also the average muscle lengths during scapular abduction. Similarly, Tables 4 and 5 present the average muscle lengths for each prosthesis design during internal and external rotation with the arm at the side, respectively.
During scapular abduction with a fixed scapula, superior impingement was noted due to greater tuberosity contact with the acromion, coracoid, or both (where the average range of motion for the non-offset rTSA and offset rTSA was observed to be 15[degrees] to 67[degrees] and 15[degrees] to 63[degrees], respectively).