scapegoating


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scapegoating

 [skāp´gōt-ing]
a process by which an individual or group is identified as being different from others and becomes the focus of the group's fears, anger, or aggression.
References in periodicals archive ?
The passage suggests that Cantwell's scapegoating has invaded his own consciousness.
These chapters intermingle Girard's insights into the Bible's revelation of scapegoating with his analysis of ancient myths, romantic novels, and modern philosophy, as well as his criticism of romanticism, rationalism, relativism, and secularism.
Once a society executes scapegoating against the identified victim
Campbell recognizes that women have always been among the most popular targets for scapegoating. Obviously, this has much to do with the sexual power women have over men.
Scapegoating and witch-hunts have always been pointless, inhumane activities.
To discuss scapegoating and the contagion of violence, Ciuba explores Flannery O'Connor's The Violent Bear It Away and Cormac McCarthy's Child of God.
Finally, Cousineau suggests that To the Lighthouse best demystifies scapegoating by setting up apparent scapegoats in Mr.
The chapter on To the Lighthouse is the strongest in the book, however, and the most polemical, as Cousineau writes against Woolf critics such as Tina Barr, Val Gough, Joan Lidoff, Jane Lilienfeld, and Diana Swanson, whom he sees as participating in scapegoating practices by placing unwarranted blame on male characters.
With these remarks, Claudia links the transference of the town's self-hatred onto a hyperembodied Pecola to the widespread scapegoating of Blacks in America, concluding, "The land of the entire country was hostile" (160).
Inexperienced group counselors may inaccurately assume that intense member exchanges that occur during scapegoating represent sound therapeutic process (Carroll, Bates, & Johnson, 1997).
For example, scapegoating sometimes takes place because people harbor hostile attitudes toward a particular individual or because they wish to bolster their own feelings of importance by seeing another blamed in a public manner.