scapegoating

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scapegoating

 [skāp´gōt-ing]
a process by which an individual or group is identified as being different from others and becomes the focus of the group's fears, anger, or aggression.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scapegoat should not issue its soft bleat of self pity, it should gird its loins for action.
The Scapegoat is usually housed at the Lady Lever art gallery in Port Sunlight, but will now be included in an exhibition entitled PreRaphaelite Vision -Truth to Nature which is being held at Tate Britain in London from February 12 toMay 3.
But Troy Ellerman, a lawyer representing Balco boss Victor Conte, said: "To use Conte as a scapegoat to try to get out of a ban is inexcusable."
"I feel gutted and it could be I'm being lined up as the scapegoat if the club go down.
In a nation obsessed with purity, whether it be racial, sexual, or ideological, there need to be scapegoats. As Sander Gilman theorizes about the pathologizing of the Other, when "self-integration is threatened" stereotypes arise because they are "part of our way of dealing with the instabilities of our perception of the world" (18).
The scapegoat often performs a central function in counseling groups by channeling tensions and establishing a type of unity among group members (Toker, 1972; Vogel & Bell, 1960).
The term "scapegoat" derives from an Old Testament practice in which the high priest lays his hands upon a goat that is chosen by lot and, under the belief that the guilt of the people has been transferred to the goat, he turns the goat loose in the wilderness.(1) Subsequently, the notion was broadened to include human beings who had been banished from their communities.(2) Modern usage of the term does not seem to presuppose that a transference of guilt is necessarily thought to take place when a person is made a scapegoat.
But on the other hand, they rely on scapegoating, degradation ceremonies and total banishment of the scapegoat from the professional community.
Michiel Heyns rereads a century of realist fiction through a new and intriguing critical lens, one heavily influenced by Rene Girard's The Scapegoat (Baltimore, MD, and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986).
Emotion, rather than reason, urges her judgement against Mary Crawford: one which requires the expulsion of the scapegoat but leaves the community of values correspondingly straitened.
Heyns's subtitle is 'The Scapegoat in English Realist Fiction', but in fact what interests him, and absorbs his attention more and more the farther he proceeds, is 'scapegoating'.
Litigation against professionals is termed "scapegoat litigation" because, ATRA says, the targeted defendants are not the parties directly responsible for the financial losses.