scanty

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scanty

(skăn′tē) [ME. from O. Norse, skamt, short]
Not abundant; insufficient, as a secretion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the budget audit report is open to the public, there is scant information about whether remarks are accepted and to what extent.
She is an MP with one of the largest POA memberships in her constituency and she has shown scant regard for the views of the POA.
Histologic examination revealed that the mass was a PLGA; it was made up of clusters of cells with predominantly round to oval nuclei, small nucleoli, and scant cytoplasm arranged in islands surrounded by a mucohyaline stroma (figure 3).
Built around the hazy tales and legends of Britannic princess Ursula in the fifth century, Ursula's Maiden Army is a reworking of the known legends and scant facts that surround the princess' maiden army of thousands who defended their homeland from invading Picts, Hibernians, and Saxons when their men did not return from their recall to the Continent, in the beginning of what would become the collapse of the Roman Empire.
They have no recollection of the pre-Vatican II religious education that made only scant references to the Bible and never used it as a text.
As noted here last month, there is a big price to pay for the re-emergence of an International Style: a mutant version of ideal Modernism is marching across the developing world with scant regard for ecology, aesthetics or even simple functional need.
So it's sad that, in an essay called "On Himself," Olitski pays scant homage to Greenberg, who always supported him and has written tellingly about him.
The project is estimated to cost over $200 billion, and while Moon insists that "Russian scholars and political leaders" have expressed interest in the idea, it has received scant attention in the United States.
Cavalli contrasted this excess with the scant attention to the case of Father Joseph Fessio, S.
And scant "mercy" can be expected from the Mugabe regime.
Here lies part of the price of the war on terror, particularly the war in Iraq, for the United States and Bush: The good done quietly on other fronts gains scant recognition because war against a constant terrorist threat is seen to be the overriding message from the administration.
The novel is written with a great ear for language and a deceptive sophistication that creeps up on readers as they race through the scant 195 pages.