scanning electron microscope

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Related to Scanning electron microscopy: Transmission electron microscopy

microscope

 [mi´kro-skōp]
an instrument used to obtain an enlarged image of small objects and reveal details of structure not otherwise distinguishable.
The light path of a darkfield microscope. From Hart and Shears, 1997.
acoustic microscope one using very high frequency ultrasound waves, which are focused on the object; the reflected beam is converted to an image by electronic processing.
binocular microscope one with two eyepieces, permitting use of both eyes simultaneously.
compound microscope one consisting of two lens systems whereby the image formed by the system near the object is magnified by the one nearer the eye.
darkfield microscope one so constructed that illumination is from the side of the field so that details appear light against a dark background.
electron microscope one in which an electron beam, instead of light, forms an image for viewing, allowing much greater magnification and resolution. The image may be viewed on a fluorescent screen or may be photographed. Types include scanning and transmission electron microscopes.
fluorescence microscope one used for the examination of specimens stained with fluorochromes or fluorochrome complexes, e.g., a fluorescein-labeled antibody, which fluoresces in ultraviolet light.
light microscope one in which the specimen is viewed under ordinary illumination.
operating microscope one designed for use in performance of delicate surgical procedures, e.g., on the middle ear or small vessels of the heart.
phase microscope (phase-contrast microscope) a microscope that alters the phase relationships of the light passing through and that passing around the object, the contrast permitting visualization of the object without the necessity for staining or other special preparation.
scanning electron microscope (SEM) an electron microscope that produces a high magnification image of the surface of a metal-coated specimen by scanning an electron beam and building an image from the electrons reflected at each point.
simple microscope one that consists of a single lens.
slit lamp microscope a corneal microscope with a special attachment that permits examination of the endothelium on the posterior surface of the cornea.
stereoscopic microscope a binocular microscope modified to give a three-dimensional view of the specimen.
transmission electron microscope (TEM) an electron microscope that produces highly magnified images of ultrathin tissue sections or other specimens. An electron beam passes through the metal-impregnated specimen and is focused by magnetic lenses into an image.
x-ray microscope one in which x-rays are used instead of light, the image usually being reproduced on film.

scan·ning e·lec·tron mi·cro·scope

a microscope in which the object in a vacuum is scanned in a raster pattern by a slender electron beam, generating reflected and secondary electrons from the specimen surface that are used to modulate the image on a synchronously scanned cathode ray tube; with this method a three-dimensional image is obtained, with both high resolution and great depth of focus.

scan·ning e·lec·tron mi·cro·scope

(skan'ing ĕ-lek'tron mī'krŏ-skōp)
A microscope in which the object in a vacuum is scanned in a raster pattern by a slender electron beam, generating reflected and secondary electrons from the specimen surface that are used to modulate the image on a synchronously scanned cathode ray tube; with this method a three-dimensional image is obtained, with both high resolution and great depth of focus.

scanning electron microscope

see ELECTRON MICROSCOPE.

scan·ning e·lec·tron mi·cro·scope

(skan'ing ĕ-lek'tron mī'krŏ-skōp)
A microscope in which the object in a vacuum is scanned in a raster pattern by a slender electron beam, generating reflected and secondary electrons from the specimen surface that are used to modulate the image on a synchronously scanned cathode ray tube; with this method a three-dimensional image is obtained, with both high resolution and great depth of focus.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scanning electron microscopy studies showed prolific SARS-CoV on infected cell surface 15 hours after infection.
Scanning electron microscopy (SEM): A type of electron microscope in which a focused electron beam is scanned in a raster on a solid sample surface.
It was excised 24 papillary muscles with the corresponding chordae tendineae which were processed for scanning electron microscopy. The specimens were sectioned in small samples and divided in four groups, a control one and the others submitted to digestion in a solution of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite in saline solution during 5, 10 and 15 minutes respectively.
For ultrastructural analysis, bacterial specimens were fixed in 2% formalin and processed for scanning electron microscopy. Briefly, glass or plastic coverslips containing the adherent bacteria were postfixed with 1% osmium tetraoxide, dehydrated by sequential ethanol concentrations, dried to critical point, and coated with a mixture of gold and paladium (27).
Dirk Stenkamp, Managing Director of Carl Zeiss NTS, states: "The Helium ion microscopy technology developed by ALIS complements our market leading scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technology and will be a key element of our future technology roadmap.
To determine what kind of stone the axes were made of, Lu used X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis.
The samples were mounted on metal stubs, coated with gold and examined under a scanning electron microscopy JEOL, JSM-6,100 at 10 kV.
On the basis of the above characteristics, and especially taking into account the ascospore ornamentation observed under scanning electron microscopy (Figure 2), we identified the isolate as N.
Researchers at NIST, in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, Thin Film Magnetism Group, have used the NIST Scanning Electron Microscopy with Polarization Analysis (SEMPA) facility to directly image the magnetic domain structure of mesoscopic ring magnets.
This article will discuss some of the cryogenic ultramicrotoming, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy (LM) techniques that are useful when the components include olefinic polymers that are characteristically low in chemical reactivity and often difficult to distinguish form each other in blends.
This method is already well established in the preparation of samples for scanning electron microscopy, where samples are usually coated with an extremely thin layer of gold.

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