scaling

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scaling

 [skāl´ing]
1. the removal of plaque, bacterial endotoxins, and calculus from a tooth with a scaler.
2. measurement of something using a scale.
hand scaling scaling and oral débridement using a manual scaler.
ultrasonic scaling scaling using an ultrasonic scaler.

sca·ling

(skā'ling),
In dentistry, removal of accretions from the crowns and roots of teeth by use of special instruments.

scaling

Periodontics The removal of dental plaque–an early lesion that predisposes to periodontitis and 'tartar' or calculus from the crown of a tooth and/or exposed root surfaces. See Periodontal disease.

scal·ing

(skāl'ing)
dentistry Removal of accretions from the crowns and roots of teeth by use of special instruments.

scaling

Removal of dental calculus from the teeth to prevent or treat PERIODONTAL DISEASE. The hard calculus is levered or scraped off with a sharp-pointed steel scaler and the teeth are polished with an abrasive.

scal·ing

(skāl'ing)
In dentistry, removal of accretions from crowns and roots of teeth by use of special instruments.

Patient discussion about scaling

Q. how do i grade the severeness of my asthma? is there like a common scale for it?

A. Yes, it's graded according to the frequency of the day-time (from 2 days in a week to continuous symptoms) and night time (from 2 nights per month to every night) symptoms. The more frequent the disease, the more aggressive the treatment is.

You may read more here:
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/Asthma/Asthma_WhatIs.html

Q. how would recognize the severeness of every Autistic person? is there like a known chart and scale for it???

A. there's the "Social Responsiveness Scale" (SRS).
The SRS measures the severity of social impairment associated with autism spectrum disorders.

More discussions about scaling
References in periodicals archive ?
Using such a variant for deluxe scaling but without choosing the coarse space adaptively was first introduced and numerically tested in [9]; see Remark 4.14.
Extension with a modification of deluxe scaling. In the following, we construct a scaling for the extension which can be used as an alternative to the second eigenvalue problem (6.2).
When using the scaling in Definition 6.1, we build the vectors [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] instead of [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], l = i, j, where [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] are the eigenvectors computed from (6.1).
Let [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] be the scaling matrices in Definition 6.1.
The condition number for our FETI-DP method with a scaling as defined in Definition 6.1 with all vertices primal and the coarse space enhanced with solutions of the eigenvalue problem (6.1) satisfies
As in Section 6.3, we can replace the matrices [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], by the economic version [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in the scaling in Definition 6.1 and in the generalized eigenvalue problem 6.1.
For the scaling matrices, a factorization of [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] has to be performed.
The computation of the left-hand side of the generalized eigenvalue problem in Section 5.2 also needs applications of the scaling matrices [D.sup.(i)] and [D.sup.(j)], which in case of deluxe scaling, is more expensive than for multiplicity- or [rho]-scaling.
In apposition to the range in the scaling exponent of body diameter, which spans one order of magnitude, the range in the scaling exponent for body mass with respect to body length is comparatively confined (i.e., 2.74 [is less than or equal to] [[Alpha].sub.RMA] [is less than or equal to] 3.23) and is entirely compatible with that predicted by geometric similitude.
Size-dependent differential scaling in branches: the mechanical design of trees revisited.
The scaling of plant height: a comparison among major plant clades and anatomical grades.
Influence of tissue density-specific mechanical properties on the scaling of plant height.