scalenus


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sca·lene

(skā'lēn),
1. Having sides of unequal length, said of a triangle so formed.
2. One of several muscles so named.
Synonym(s): scalenus
[G. skalēnos, uneven]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

scalenus

(skā-lē′nəs)
n. pl. scale·ni (-nī, -nē)
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

scalenus

(skā-lē′nŭs) [L., uneven]
One of three deeply situated muscles on each side of the neck, extending from the tubercles of the transverse processes of the third through sixth cervical vertebrae to the first or second rib. The three muscles are the scalenus anterior (anticus), medius, and posterior.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
However, unfortunately, the excision margins adjacent to the scalenus medius muscle were positive.
Observation Sex Total Female Male Cx rib only 48 (40%) 6 (32%) 54 (39%) Cx rib and fibrous band 37 (31%) 9 (47%) 46 (33%) Cx rib and hypertrophied 7 (6%) 1 (5%) 8 (6%) scalenus muscle Cx.
Structures in this region commonly assessed by clinicians include the cervical lymph nodes, external jugular vein, brachial plexus, SCM and scalenus muscles.
A moderate decrease in right lateral flexion and right rotation associated with muscular spasms (bilaterally) at the cervical paraspinal and scalenus muscles was present.
It blends with the parietal pleura and is reinforced by the scalenus minimus muscle.
The subclavian vein lies anteriorly, separated from the artery by anterior scalenus as it inserts into the first rib at the tubercle of Lisfranc.
Surgical treatment for symptoms produced by cervical ribs and the scalenus anticus muscle.
Other causes of brachial plexus neuropathies include compression and pinching of the nerves due to anatomical variations and clinical complications caused by clavicle fracture, thoracic outlet syndrome, scalenus syndrome, pectoralis minor syndrome, and presence of a cervical rib (Ghefter et al, 2012).
It passes between longus colli and scalenus anterior muscle, behind the common carotid artery and the vertebral vein through the foramina in the transverse processes of all of the cervical vertebrae except the seventh, curves medially behind the lateral mass of the atlas and enters the cranium via the foramen magnum.
The key points in both the approaches are (1) complete resection of bony, cartilaginous, and fibrous parts of (2) complete resection of the scalenus anterior muscle at the scalene tubercle on the first rib and (3) arterial exploration and reconstruction.