scalene muscle


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Related to scalene muscle: anterior scalene muscle

scalene muscle

n.
Any of three muscles on each side of the neck that originate at the cervical vertebrae and insert into either the first or second ribs, serving to bend and rotate the neck and assist breathing by raising the first and second ribs. Also called scalenus.

scalene muscle

The anterior, the middle, or the posterior scalene muscle -- neck muscles. Origins: transverse processes of vertebrae C1-C7. Insertions: upper surfaces of ribs 1-2. Nerves: cervical spinal C4-C8. Actions: raises ribs 1-2, bends neck ipsilaterally.
See also: muscle

scalene muscle

see Table 13.1I.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common site of origin in the head and neck is the masseter muscle, whereas IMH originating from the scalene muscles are rarely seen.
In English literature, there are only five reported cases of intramuscular hemagioma that were all originating from scalene muscles (3-6).
Scalene muscles and the brachial plexus: anatomical variations and their clinical significance.
The scalene muscles are especially variable, and physiotherapists can clearly benefit from understanding some of the common variations that exist and how they may impact on clinical practice.
Repeatability of surface EMG variables in the sternocleidomastoid and anterior scalene muscles.
Third, exercises are recommended to strengthen the shoulder girdle muscles and stretch the scalene muscles.
The thoracic outlet is the opening between the scalene muscles and the rib cage.
The subclavian artery emerges from between the anterior and middle scalene muscles and becomes the axillary artery as it passes the first rib.
b) It is found medial to the scalene muscles, lateral to the longus coli muscle, oesophagus and trachea, by the recurrent laryngeal nerve.
The dynamic movement of sudden standing stresses the ribs and the maldistribution of forces across the scalene muscles and pectoralis major, impact on the sternum, resulting in the sternal stress fracture.
Traction'-type forces (categories (ii) and (iii) above) cause fractures close to the scalene tubercule, the point of insertion of the scalene muscles.
The stellate ganglion is located medial to the scalene muscles, lateral to the longus colli muscle and the trachea, together with the laryngeal recurrent nerve, anterior to the transverse process; the inferior most section is located posteriorly to the superior margin of the first section of the subclavian artery and at the origin of the vertebral artery, posterior to the apex of the lung.