scalded skin syndrome


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staph·y·lo·coc·cal scald·ed skin syn·drome

a disease affecting infants in whom large areas of skin peel off, as in a second-degree burn, as a result of upper respiratory staphylococcal infection even though the skin lesions are sterile; the level of skin separation is subcorneal, unlike a burn or the clinically similar toxic epidermal necrolysis that occurs in children and adults and which involves subepidermal cleavage.
Synonym(s): Lyell disease

staph·y·lo·coc·cal scald·ed skin syn·drome

a disease affecting infants in whom large areas of skin peel off, as in a second-degree burn, as a result of upper respiratory staphylococcal infection even though the skin lesions are sterile; the level of skin separation is subcorneal, unlike a burn or the clinically similar toxic epidermal necrolysis that occurs in children and adults and which involves subepidermal cleavage.
Synonym(s): Lyell disease

scalded skin syndrome

References in periodicals archive ?
Criteria for the diagnosis of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in adults.
A) Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (Ritter`s disease) Commonly seen in infants and children, this condition is caused by Staphylococcus aureus phage type 71 due to liberation of exotoxin.27 The clinical features include diffuse erythema, fever, tender skin, large flaccid bullae with clear fluid which rupture soon after being formed.
It wasn't until the next day that blood tests confirmed she was suffering from scalded skin syndrome.
Little is known about the effective role played by the patient's immune response during SSSS and the occurrence of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in adults is limited to few reports on literature.
The doctors told me Ryan's case of Scalded Skin Syndrome was so severe he would have recovered more quickly from having boiling water poured over him.
The presence of generalized blistering and systemic symptoms would suggest conditions related to medication exposure, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis; infectious etiologies (eg, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome); autoimmune causes; or underlying malignancy.
Concomitant varicella and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome. J Pediatr.
The test is also positive in staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) but, here, the split is very superficial and the clinical picture resembles erythroderma with only a limited involvement of the mucous membrane.
These other illnesses were cytomegalovirus (in 21 children), adenovirus (16), systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (12), Epstein-Barr virus (5), and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (1).
The rate of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) appears to be on the rise among children in the United States, according to an analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample.
Separation, either at the dermal-epidermal junction or intraepidermally, raises the specter of 2 emergent conditions: the Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SIS/TEN) spectrum and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS).
The diagnosis is typically made clinically; there is little in the way of diagnostic testing for scalded skin syndrome. Biopsies or cultures of the eyes, nose, or pharynx can be performed, but Dr.