scalded skin syndrome


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staph·y·lo·coc·cal scald·ed skin syn·drome

a disease affecting infants in whom large areas of skin peel off, as in a second-degree burn, as a result of upper respiratory staphylococcal infection even though the skin lesions are sterile; the level of skin separation is subcorneal, unlike a burn or the clinically similar toxic epidermal necrolysis that occurs in children and adults and which involves subepidermal cleavage.
Synonym(s): Lyell disease

staph·y·lo·coc·cal scald·ed skin syn·drome

a disease affecting infants in whom large areas of skin peel off, as in a second-degree burn, as a result of upper respiratory staphylococcal infection even though the skin lesions are sterile; the level of skin separation is subcorneal, unlike a burn or the clinically similar toxic epidermal necrolysis that occurs in children and adults and which involves subepidermal cleavage.
Synonym(s): Lyell disease

scalded skin syndrome

scalded skin syndrome

scalded skin syndrome

a disease of human skin mirrored closely by a lesion in Greyhounds from which pure cultures of Staphylococcus aureus can be isolated. The lesions commence as large, thin-walled bullae along the dorsum of the neck and trunk which cause erection of a patch of hair. Rupture of the bullae leads to loss of hair and scab formation. See also sore.
References in periodicals archive ?
Criteria for the diagnosis of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in adults.
B) Neonatal cutaneous infections Neonates, especially premature and low birth weight infants are susceptible to various fatal infections like staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS), necrotizing fasciitis, neonatal varicella, neonatal herpes simplex infection (HSV) and cutaneous candidiasis.
This first work on cytokine and NO production in adult staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome could be useful in further studies concerning immunological mechanisms involved in this disease or alternative therapy implementation.
The doctors told me Ryan's case of Scalded Skin Syndrome was so severe he would have recovered more quickly from having boiling water poured over him.
Varicella Zoster Virus complicated with staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome.
The test is also positive in staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) but, here, the split is very superficial and the clinical picture resembles erythroderma with only a limited involvement of the mucous membrane.
Separation, either at the dermal-epidermal junction or intraepidermally, raises the specter of 2 emergent conditions: the Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SIS/TEN) spectrum and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS).
These other illnesses were cytomegalovirus (in 21 children), adenovirus (16), systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (12), Epstein-Barr virus (5), and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (1).
It is especially important to rule out herpes simplex, varicella, bullous tinea, bullous fixed drug reaction, bullous drug eruption, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome.
Conditions with a presentation similar to SIS/ TEN include erythema multiforme, erythematous drug reaction, pustular drug eruptions, sunburn, toxic shock syndrome, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, and paraneoplastic pemphigus.
These other illnesses were cytomegalovirus (in 21 children), adenovirus (16), systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (12), EpsteinBarr virus (5), and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (1).
Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, for example, is often thought to be a nondeadly disease, but it is associated with a mortality of up to 7%, particularly in the very young and should be identified early, said Dr.