scab


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to scab: scabies

scab

 [skab]
1. the crust of a superficial sore.
2. to become covered with a crust or scab.

scab

(skab),
A crust formed by coagulation of blood, pus, serum, or a combination of these, on the surface of an ulcer, erosion, or other type of wound.
[A.S. scaeb]

scab

(skab)
1. the crust of a superficial sore.
2. to become covered with a crust or scab.

scab

(skăb)
n.
1. A crust discharged from and covering a healing wound.
2. Scabies or mange in domestic animals or livestock, especially sheep.
3.
a. Any of various plant diseases caused by fungi or bacteria and resulting in crustlike spots on fruit, leaves, or roots.
b. The spots caused by such a disease.
intr.v. scabbed, scabbing, scabs
1. To become covered with scabs or a scab.
2. To work or take a job as a scab.

scab

See eschar.

SCAB

Oncology Strepozotocin, CCNU, doxorubicin, bleomycin A 'salvage' chemotherapy regimen used for Pts with disease–eg, lymphoma relapse after RT or chemotherapy. See Salvage chemotherapy.

scab

(skab)
A crust formed by coagulation of blood, pus, serum, or a combination of these, on the surface of an ulcer, erosion, or other type of wound.
[A.S. scaeb]

scab

A skin crust formed when serum leaking from a damaged area mixes with pus and dead skin and then clots.

scab

A skin crust formed when serum leaking from a damaged area mixes with pus and dead skin and then clots.

scab

a symptom of various plant diseases in which there are local areas of surface roughening, e.g. apple scab caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, a HEMIBIOTROPH.

scab

wound surface crust/eschar; formed of dried exudate and blood

scab

1. a crust composed of coagulated serum, blood, pus and skin debris covering a skin lesion.
2. used colloquially to mean psoroptic mange.

scab mites
References in periodicals archive ?
Counties in North Wales had significantly higher rates of scab, notably in Conwy, where six out of 10 farmers reported having the disease in their flocks.
47) It was not until 1924 that, as an indirect result of industrial action taken by the South Australian Labour Council and the Seamens Union, preference was removed from the P&Cs on the deep-sea vessels in Sydney harbour, and all but eight members of the scab union were absorbed into the WWF.
Table 2 presents correlations between SCAB total and factor scores and the six Holland code types; all SCAB factors significantly, positively related to the VPI Artistic factor.
Narrator D: Four days later, the strike is still on, but attacks on scabs and delivery carts are less frequent.
Soaking a scab in water causes it to soften and turn white.
These results provide some preliminary evidence for the construct validity of the SCAB.
An early- to mid-season variety available in early September, Liberty is resistant to the "big four" diseases: apple scab, cedar apple rust, fire blight, and powdery mildew.
More than a third believe that a wound no longer needs a bandage once it forms a scab.
Although the rattail is synonymous with the drag and the buckle and scab with the cope, the three expansion defects may be found on either casting surface.
Short pants and bathing suits meant scrapes and cuts that eventually would form a scab, but I would try to remove it too soon with the result that the healing took longer.
A fungal disease called scab has cost farmers in the Northern Plains an estimated $2.
Scab is a disease which has afflicted sheep from Biblical times;(1) it was first imported into Australia in the sheep of the First Fleet and quickly became the most serious animal health problem facing pastoralists.