saturnine


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saturnine

 [sat´ur-nīn]
pertaining to lead.

sat·ur·nine

(sat'ŭr-nīn),
1. Relating to lead.
2. Due to or symptomatic of lead poisoning.
[Mediev. L. saturninus, fr. saturnus, lead, fr. L. saturnus, the god and planet Saturn]

saturnine

(săt′ər-nīn′)
adj.
1. Having the temperament of one born under the supposed astrological influence of Saturn.
2.
a. Melancholy or sullen.
b. Having or marked by a tendency to be bitter or sardonic: a saturnine expression on his face.
3. Produced by absorption of lead.

sat′ur·nine′ly adv.

saturnine

[sat′ərnīn]
pertaining to lead or lead poisoning.

sat·ur·nine

(sat'ŭr-nīn)
1. Relating to lead.
2. Due to or symptomatic of lead poisoning.
3. Denotes a surly facial expression.
[Mediev. L. saturninus, fr. saturnus, lead, fr. L. Saturnus, the god and planet Saturn]

saturnine

pertaining to lead, the poisonous metal.
References in periodicals archive ?
The key difference however is that popular Western descriptions of this biotype depict a kind of Saturnine old man; bearded, grumpy, distracted by his pontifications and somewhat disillusioned.
He persuasively remarks that a saturnine belief in fatalism will become a self-fulfilling prophecy.
He rejects Howe's optimistic faith in the capacity of writers to evoke plausible models of "heroic struggle" in what he sees as, borrowing Winston Churchill's saturnine words, "the terrible twentieth century" (12, 1).
One might surmise, based on Verlaine's later reference to Goya in a brief commentary on "Les Effares," that he saw in this literary homage a kind of encrypted reference to the poet's Saturnine temperament, with all the potentially transgressive dimensions this term might entail: not only is Verlaine the poete saturnien par excellence, but in the Album zutique, Ernest Cabaner is caricatured as a Saturn with an improbably large phallus indulging in an act of auto-fellatio (which leads one to wonder whether "Saturn," as a mangeur de grains, wasn't a more or less decipherable antonomasis in gay slang/culture of the era).
Saturnine, the heroine, takes the RER local train to get to Bluebeard's mansion, where a suspiciously cheap rental awaits her.
If something may be said about the sulphur of gold, though, the separation thereof is supremely difficult and the ordinary modes thereof used by artists, as already mentioned, by saline, saturnine, or urinous solvents, are not at all suitable, much less can it be captured by those weaker things, the spirits of manna, dew, honey, wine, or hart's horn.
Goetzel, in fact, chose to repeat it for an encore, so we were duly sated (perhaps overly so) with the glory of saluting the empress of fate and her saturnine minions.
Abu Ma'sar provided an extensive list of saturnine traits, many of which directly relate to Ignatius Reilly.
it assumes the past repeats itself, which hardly seems likely, and that the past can be understood by posterity as offering simple moral lessons--history as a kind of McGuffey's Reader writ large--when in fact history is almost never morally binary, but rather bears out Walter Benjamin's saturnine claim that every document of civilization is also a document of barbarism.
And the Hungarian Bela Lugosi's saturnine Count with sibilant accent was so impressive that in 1931 he starred as the vampire in the first Dracula talkie.
If Olbermann was the Bush era's defining liberal newsman--as saturnine in his righteousness as Dick Cheney in his--Maddow has taken on that same role for the Obama years (even spawning proteges of her own).