saturnine


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saturnine

 [sat´ur-nīn]
pertaining to lead.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sat·ur·nine

(sat'ŭr-nīn),
1. Relating to lead.
2. Due to or symptomatic of lead poisoning.
[Mediev. L. saturninus, fr. saturnus, lead, fr. L. saturnus, the god and planet Saturn]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

saturnine

(săt′ər-nīn′)
adj.
1. Having the temperament of one born under the supposed astrological influence of Saturn.
2.
a. Melancholy or sullen.
b. Having or marked by a tendency to be bitter or sardonic: a saturnine expression on his face.
3. Produced by absorption of lead.

sat′ur·nine′ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sat·ur·nine

(sat'ŭr-nīn)
1. Relating to lead.
2. Due to or symptomatic of lead poisoning.
3. Denotes a surly facial expression.
[Mediev. L. saturninus, fr. saturnus, lead, fr. L. Saturnus, the god and planet Saturn]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(10,18-22) Yet, hyperuricemia is expected to precede the possible secondary complications (increased creatinine/urea and saturnine gout) related with nephrotoxicity.
Devlin, 'a saturnine Irishman' in Mailer's words, was hired by him in 1948 to edit Naked.
The key difference however is that popular Western descriptions of this biotype depict a kind of Saturnine old man; bearded, grumpy, distracted by his pontifications and somewhat disillusioned.
He persuasively remarks that a saturnine belief in fatalism will become a self-fulfilling prophecy.
He rejects Howe's optimistic faith in the capacity of writers to evoke plausible models of "heroic struggle" in what he sees as, borrowing Winston Churchill's saturnine words, "the terrible twentieth century" (12, 1).
Saturnine, the heroine, takes the RER local train to get to Bluebeard's mansion, where a suspiciously cheap rental awaits her.
If something may be said about the sulphur of gold, though, the separation thereof is supremely difficult and the ordinary modes thereof used by artists, as already mentioned, by saline, saturnine, or urinous solvents, are not at all suitable, much less can it be captured by those weaker things, the spirits of manna, dew, honey, wine, or hart's horn.
Goetzel, in fact, chose to repeat it for an encore, so we were duly sated (perhaps overly so) with the glory of saluting the empress of fate and her saturnine minions.
Abu Ma'sar provided an extensive list of saturnine traits, many of which directly relate to Ignatius Reilly.
it assumes the past repeats itself, which hardly seems likely, and that the past can be understood by posterity as offering simple moral lessons--history as a kind of McGuffey's Reader writ large--when in fact history is almost never morally binary, but rather bears out Walter Benjamin's saturnine claim that every document of civilization is also a document of barbarism.