sarcoptic


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sar·cop·tic

(sar-kop'tik),
Of, relating to, or caused by mites of the genus Sarcoptes or other members of the family Sarcoptidae.

sar·cop·tic

(sahr-kop'tik)
Of, relating to, or caused by mites of the genus Sarcoptes or other members of the family Sarcoptidae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just sniffing noses isn't enough to get it." So, if you notice a dog that is showing signs of sarcoptic mange out on a walk, you don't necessarily need to be concerned about your dog.
In January 2018, sarcoptic mange was suspected on a farm in the Jura Mountains, Switzerland.
Disease reveals the predator: sarcoptic mange, red fox predation and prey populations.--Ecology 75: 1042-1049.
Sarcoptic mange in domestic animals and human scabies in India.
Martin AM, Burridge CP, Ingram J, Fraser TA and Carver S (2017) Invasive pathogen drives host population collapse: effects of a travelling wave of sarcoptic mange on bare-nosed wombats.
The majority are suffering from sarcoptic mange as a result of overcrowding.
That's 150 patience-straining minutes of Staffs, terriers, cockapoos, spaniels, salukis, mastiffs, lurchers, setters, shnoodles, rotties, puggles and corgis - not to mention having to put up with host Sara Cox, herself a bigger irritant than sarcoptic mange.
When we first met Ating, she was almost completely hairless from sarcoptic mange, but her loyal owner still slept next to her every night.
(http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/09/03/zombie-dogs-roaming-near-chicago-are-infected-coyotes-police-warn.html) According to the officials , these coyotes are infected with a virus called the sarcoptic mange, a highly contagious skin disease that makes them look like the undead. 
It finds a warm home under their collars, which can torment wolves who are infested with the pest, causing itching and distress, leading to further deterioration of their condition."); Paul Cross, Effects of Sarcoptic Mange on Gray Wolves in Yellowstone Park, U.S.
Sarcoptic mange in rabbits is described as an uncommon disease (Scott et al.