sarcopenic obesity

sarcopenic obesity

A form of obesity which is operationally defined as excess weight and reduced muscle mass and/or strength, a combination that occurs in 4 to 9% of obese patients. Formal confirmation that a person has sarcopenic obesity requires higher-tech tools—e.g., CT, dual X-ray absorptiometry, anthropometrics and bioelectrical impedance—which should be reserved for thorough clinical examination and for assessing the effectiveness of interventions.

Aetiology
Age-related changes in body composition, physical inactivity, inflammation, insulin resistance, reduced growth hormone and testosterone, malnutrition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although subjects > 136 kg were excluded from that study thereby limiting the reference data, applying this method to the current study cohort produced similar results, identifying 12.6% of females and 17.6% of males with sarcopenic obesity. Similar to Siervo et al.
Additionally, adults with sarcopenic obesity [18], low muscle mass, and elevated body fat also tend to have higher levels of metabolic syndrome [19], insulin resistance [20, 21], and several cardiovascular risk factors [20], compared to their counterparts.
Of interest, muscle mass reduction was observed, similarly to the pathological state known as sarcopenic obesity in some metabolic dysfunction states associated with MS and atherosclerosis [35, 36].
Prevalence and determinant factors of sarcopenia in patients with type 2 diabetes: the Korean Sarcopenic Obesity Study (KSOS).
Having sarcopenia and obesity, or "sarcopenic obesity," is linked to a decline in your ability to function physically, and to an increased risk of fractures.
Imaging body composition in cancer patients: visceral obesity, sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity may impact on clinical outcome.
Sarcopenic obesity is more closely associated with knee osteoarthritis than is nonsarcopenic obesity: a cross-sectional study.
Our conclusions are different from the Korean Sarcopenic Obesity Study [11].
Sarcopenic Obesity. Chronic hemiparesis is present in nearly 50% of all long-term ischemic stroke survivors [31].
The main criticism of the definition of osteosarcopenic obesity or sarcopenic obesity is due to a lack of division between subcutaneous or visceral fat mass.
The changes induce muscular apoptosis through a high level of oxidative stress results in sarcopenic obesity and increased mortality.