saprobe


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saprobe

 [sa´prōb]
an organism, usually referring to a fungus, that feeds on dead or decaying organic matter. See also saprophyte. adj., adj sapro´bic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sa·probe

(sa'prōb),
An organism that lives on dead organic material. This term is preferable to saprophyte, because bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants.
[sapro- + G. bios, life]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

saprobe

(săp′rōb′)
sap·ro′bic (-bĭk) adj.
sap·ro′bi·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sap·robe

(sap'rōb)
An organism that lives on dead organic material. usage note This term is preferable to saprophyte, because bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants.
[sapro- + G. bios, life]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sap·robe

(sap'rōb)
An organism that lives on dead organic material. usage note This term is preferable to saprophyte, because bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants.
[sapro- + G. bios, life]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This was attributed to the sawdust's slow decomposition possibly favoring the growth of competitive soil saprobes to the detriment of soil pathogens that use simple organic substrates.
Normally, the fugal strains that produce AF reside in soil as saprobes, but can be transmitted to plant tissues when conditions are favorable (Gourama and Bullerman, 1995).
It is sug-gested that hair of animals carrying fungal biota shed from the animals may also be colonized and utilized by other soil saprobes as carbon and nitrogen source.
Many species occur as saprobes, some live endophytically, whereas others are root pathogens.
Most of these fungi, including Ascomycota, Mucoromycotina, and Zygomycetes species are saprobes, ectomycorrhizal, or plant pathogens.
They commonly inhabit the same ecological niches (Sparrow, 1968; Nascimento et al., 2011) and are essential components of the microbial food webs as saprobes decomposing plant and animal substrates, parasites of algae, macrophytes, crustaceans, fishes, amphibians, invertebrates and protists, and as food resources for consumers such as metazoan zooplankton (Niquil et al., 2011).