sanitarium

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sanitarium

 [san″ĭ-ta´re-um]
an institution for the promotion of health. The word was originally coined to designate the institution established by the Seventh Day Adventists at Battle Creek, Michigan, to distinguish it from institutions providing care for mental or tuberculous patients.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

san·i·tar·i·um

(san'i-tār'ē-ŭm), In modern usage this word is virtually synonymous with sanatorium.
A health resort. Compare: sanatorium.
Synonym(s): salutarium
[L. sanitas, health]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sanitarium

(săn′ĭ-târ′ē-əm)
n. pl. sanitar·iums or sanitar·ia (-ē-ə)
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sanitarium

A term of waning use for a healthcare facility that provides long-term inpatient care for a particular condition.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sanitarium

Health care A term of waning popularity for a health care facility that provides long-term inpatient care for a particular condition. See Saranac. Cf Hospice.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

san·i·tar·i·um

(san'i-tar'ē-ŭm)
A health resort.
Compare: sanatorium
[L. sanitas, health]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
All five sanitariums agree that the fetuses and babies should be properly buried, and are asking the health ministry to act consistently regardless of which sanitarium it is dealing with.
The conditions include limiting damages for the former patients to the impact of the reduced opportunities they had to receive medical treatment, and requiring the bereaved family members to receive the ashes of the former patients, which are now kept at the sanitariums.
Activities at one particular facility, the Clearwater Lake Sanitarium near The Pas, are the main concern for the province's First Nation chiefs and New Democrat MLA Eric Robinson.
Until the Leprosy Prevention Law was repealed in 1996, Japan segregated leprosy patients in isolated sanitariums for decades, even after it was learned that leprosy, now known in medical terms as Hansen's disease, is not highly contagious.
Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, patients were forced to enter special sanitariums and had limited freedom.
Leprosy patients were forced into sanitariums under the colonial Korean leprosy prevention ordinance, which mirrored the then-Leprosy Prevention Law in Japan.
A law took effect in 2001 to compensate leprosy patients for being forcibly isolated from society and held in sanitariums.
It is the first such applications from a former Japanese colony under the 2001 law to compensate leprosy patients for being forcibly isolated from society and held in special sanitariums.
Japan's current leprosy compensation law stipulates that compensation should be paid to all who were put into leprosy sanitariums, even if for a single day, regardless of nationality and residence.
The National Association of Leprosy Patients at Sanitariums said the government's conduct is outrageous.
The agreement noted that the government is responsible for the isolation policy, which reduced opportunities for leprosy patients to receive treatment outside of sanitariums.
The agreement document stipulates that the government will not require the bereaved relatives to take possession of the ashes of the deceased patients, which are now kept at the sanitariums, and will not limit damages for the former patients to the impact of the reduced opportunities they had to receive medical treatment.